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Full text of "The goddess of reason"



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THE GODDESS OF REASON. A Drama. 
Tall i2mo, $2.00, net. Postage extra. 

AUDREY. With Illustrations in color. Crown 
8vo, $1.50. 

PRISONERS OF HOPE. With Frontispiece. 
Crown 8vo, $1.50. 

TO HAVE AND TO HOLD. With 8 Illustra- 
tions by Howard Pylb, E. B. Thompson, 
A. W. Bbtts, and Emlbn McConnbll. 
Crown 8vo, $1.50. 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN & CO. 
Boston and Nbw York. 



THE GODDESS OF REASON 

A DRAMA IN FIVE ACTS 



COPYRIGHT 1907 BY MARY JOHNSTON 



ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



Published May iqoy 



TO 
THE HOUSEHOLD AT WOODLEY 

THIS DRAMA 
IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED 



DRAMATIS PERSONM 

Rene-Amaury de Vardes, Baron of Morbec 

Remond Lalain, Deputy from Vannes 

The Abbe Jean de Barbasan 

Count Louis de Chateau-Gui 

Captain Fauquemont de Buc 

Melipars de L'Orient 

Enguerrand La Foret 

The Vidame de Saint-Amour 

The Englishman 

Gregoire 

Raoul the Huntsman 

A Sergeant of Hussars 

Yvette 

The Marqjjise de Blancheforet 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

Mme. de Vaucourt 

Mme. de Malestroit 

Mme. de Pont a L'Arche 



viii DRAM AT IS P ERSONJE 

Sister Fidelis Celeste 

Sister Simplicia Angeliq^je 

Sister Benedicta Seraphine 

Nanon An Actress 

Guests of De Vardes; Peasants; Lackeys; Soldiers; 
Nuns; Young Girls ; The Mob at Nantes; Partici- 
pants in the Fete of the Goddess of Reason; Republican 
Commissioners ; National Soldiers ; Women of the Revo- 
lution; Royalist Prisoners; Gaolers ; fudges; Execu- 
tioners; etc., etc. 

TIME 1 791-1794 

Act I. The Chateau of Morbec in Brittany. 

Act II. The Garden of the Convent of the Visi- 
tation in Nantes. 

Act III. A Square in Nantes. 

Act IV. A Church in Nantes used as a Prison. 

Act V. Scene I. A Judgment Hall in Nantes. 
Scene II. The Banks of the Loire. 




THE 



GODDESS OF REASON 



a cr i 



The Chateau of Morbec in Brittany. A formal garden and a 
wide terrace with stone balustrade. In the background the 
chateau, white and peak-roofed, with great arched doors. 
Beyond it a distant prospect of a Breton village and of the 
sea beating against a dangerous coast. To the left a thick 
wood, to the right a perspective of garden alleys, fountains, 
and flowering trees. On the terrace a small table set with 
bread, fruit, and wine. In the angle formed by the level 
of the terrace and the wide stone steps leading into the 
garden the statue of a nymph, its high and broad pedestal 
draped with ivy. Scattered on the terrace and steps a 
litter of stones, broken cudgels, rusty and uncouth weapons. 
The sun shines, the trees wave in the wind, the birds 
sing, the flowers bloom. It is a summer morning in the 
year 1791. 

Enter from one of the garden paths a lackey and Remond 
Lalain. Lalain wears a riding dress with a tricolour 
cockade. 

Lalain 

SAY to Monsieur the Baron of Morbec, 
Remond Lalain, the Deputy from Vannes, 
In haste is riding north, but hath drawn rein — 



2 THE GODDESS 

Hearing to-day of Baron Henri's death — 
And audience craves that he may homage pay 
To Morbec's latest lord ! 

The Lackey 

I go, monsieur ! 

[Exit the lackey. 

L A L AI N 

These gloomy towers ! 

\_He muses as he paces the garden walk before the 
terrace. 

Mirabeau is dead! 
Gabriel Riquetti, dead, I salute thee, 
Great gladiator ! Who treads now the sand 
That yesterday was trod by Mirabeau ? 
Barnave, Lameth, ye are too slight of frame ! 
There's Lafayette. No, no, mon general I 
Robespierre ? Go to, thou little man ! 
Jean Paul Marat, dog leech and People's Friend ? 
Wild beast to fight with beast ! Faugh ! Down, Marat ! 
Who stands this course, why, that man 's emperor ! 
Now how would purple look upon Marat ? 
Jacques Danton ? — Danton! Hot Cordelier! 
Dark Titan forging to a Titan's end ! 
Shake not thy black locks from the tribune there, 
Nor rend the heavens with thy mighty voice ! 
'T is not for thee, the victor's golden crown, 
The voice of France — 

[The doors of the chateau open. Enter three lackeys 
bearing a great gilt chair ^ which they place with 
ceremony at the head of the steps which lead from 
the terrace into the garden. 



OF REASON 3 

First Lackey (stamping with his foot upon the terrace) 

The gilded chair place here ! 
We always judge our peasants from this chair, 
We lords of Morbec ! North terrace, gilt chair ! 

Second Lackey 
Baron Henri sat here the day he died ! 

First Lackey 

Now Baron Rene takes his turn ! 

[They place the chair. 

L a l a i n (as before) 

Danton ! 
Why not Lalain? It is as good a name ! 
Mirabeau 's dead ! Out of my way, Danton ! 

Third Lackey (gathering up the stones which lie 
upon the terrace) 

I '11 throw these stones into the shrubbery ! 

Second Lackey (lifting a rusty scythe from the steps) 
This scythe I '11 fling into the fountain ! 

First Lackey (his hands in his pockets) 

He! 
One sees quite well that we have stood a siege ! 

[The lackeys gather up the stones, the sticks, the broken 
and rusty tools and weapons. 

La lain 
Where lives the man who doth not worship Might? 
O Goddess AU-in-All ! make me thine own. 



4 THE GODDESS 

As the bright moon did make Endymion ; 
And I will rim thy Phrygian cap with stars, 
And give thee for thy cestus the tricolour ! 

Enter Gregoire. 

Gregoire 
Monsieur Lalain ! 

L a l a i n {waving his hand) 
My good Gregoire ! 

Gregoire {to the lackeys) 

Despatch ! 
Monseigneur will be here anon ! 

[He glances at the stones, etc. 

Rubbish ! 

Away with 't ! 

[Passing the statue of the nymph, he strikes it with 
his hand. 

Will you forever smile ? 
Stone lips that long have smiled at bitter wrong! 
You might, my dear, have lost that smile last night ! 

First Lackey 
Last night was something like ! 

Second Lackey {throwing the stones one by one into 
the shrubbery) 

Sangdieu ! last night 
My heart was water ! 

Gregoire 

Ah, poltroon ; your heart ! 



OF REASON 5 

Third Lackey (making play with a broken stick) 
Our baron 's a swordsman ! His rapier flashed ! 

First Lackey 
Keen as the blade of the Sieur de Morbec ! 

— And that is a saying old as the sea ! 

Second Lackey 
Hard as the heart of the Sieur de Morbec ! 

— And that was said before the sea was made ! 

[They laugh. 

Third Lackey (pointing to Lalain) 
What 's he ? 

G R E GO I RE 

The advocate Remond Lalain. 

Third Lackey 
A patriot ? 

G R E GO I RE 

Hotter than Lanjuinais! 

Third Lackey 
What does he at Morbec ? 

Gregoire 

How should I know ? 
His home was once within the village there, 
And now and then he visits the cure. 

First Lac key 
The cure ! He visits Yvette Charruel ! 

Lalain (as before) 
Mirabeau and I were born in the south. 



6 THE GODDESS 

Oh, the orange flower beside the wall ! 
And the shaken olives when Mistral wakes ! 

Gregoire 
Once they were friends. Baron Rene and he; 
The Revolution came between — 

First Lackey (He sends a pike whirling into the 

shrubbery) 

Long live 
The Revolution ! 

Gregoire 
My friend, 't will live 
Without thy bawling ! 

Third Lackey (arranging the bottles upon the small 

table) 

So ! The red wine here, 
The white wine there ! 

(To a fallen bottle?) Stand up, Aristocrat ! 

L A L A I N 

The sun is high ! 

\_He approaches the terrace and addresses the nearest 
lackey. 

How long must I await 

The pleasure of Monsieur the Baron here ? 

The Lac key 

Monsieur ? 

Lal a i N 
Go, fellow, go ! and to him say, 
Remond Lalain — 



OF REASON 7 

The Lackey 

I go, monsieur ! 

[Exit the lackey. 
Lalai n 

*T is well, 
Rene de Vardes, to keep me waiting thus ! 

[Gregoire pours wine into a glass and descending 
the steps offers it to Lalai n. 

Gregoire 
The old vintage, Monsieur Lalain ! 

Lalain 

Thanks, friend. 
The day is warm. 

[He raises the glass to his lips. Laughter and voices 
from the winding garden paths. 

What 's that ? 

Gregoire (shrugging) 

More guests, no doubt ! 
The count, the vidame, and the young marquise ! 
All Morbihan felicitates Morbec, 
And brings our baron bonbons and bouquets, 
As if there were no hunger and no frost ! 

[A distant sound from the wood of harsh and com- 
plaining voices. 

Lalain 
And that ? 

Gregoire 
Soldiers and huntsmen beat the woods; 
For half the village is in hiding there, 



8 THE GODDESS 

Having assayed last night to burn Morbec ! 

As if 't would burn ! This time the soldiers came ! 

Mon Dieu ! the times are bad. 

L a l a i n {abruptly) 

All the village ! 
Did Yvette Charruel — 

Gregoire {shrugging) 
Yvette ! 

First Lackey {from the terrace) 

Yvette ! 

Second Lackey 

I warrant monseigneur will hang Yvette ! 

[Lalain pours the wine upon the ground and throws 
the glass from him. It shatters against the balustrade. 
Laughter and voices. Guests appear in the garden 
walks, the women in swelling skirts of silk or muslin, 
powdered hair and large hats ; the men in brocade 
and silk with cane swords, or in hunting dress. 

A Lady {curtseying) 
Monsieur le Vicomte ! 

A Gentleman {bowing) 
Madame la Baronne ! 

Mme. de Malestroit 
A heavenly day. 

Enguerrand La Foret 
No cloud in the sky. 



OF REASON 9 

The Vidame [saluting a gentleman) 
Count Louis de Chateau-Gui ! 

Count Louis 

Ah, monsieur ! 

[Presents his snuff-box. 

Mme. de Pont a L'Arche 
For laces I advise Louise. Fichus ? 
The Bleeding Heart above the flower shop. 

The Vidame 
— A lettre de cachet. To Vincennes he went ! 

Mme. de Malestroit 
But ah ! what use of laces or fichus ! 
We emigrate so fast there 's none to see ! 

The Englishman 
I quote a great man — my Lord Chesterfield : 
" Exist in the unhappy land of France 
All signs that history hath ever shown " — 

Mme. de Pont a L'Arche 
The Queen wore carnation, Madame, pale rose, 
The Dauphin — 

Lalain 

What do I in this galley ? 
(To Gregoire.) I '11 walk aside ! [Exit Lalain. 

Count Louis (/# Gregoire) 
Was that Remond Lalain ? 



io THE GODDESS 

Gregoire 
It was, Monsieur le Comte. 

Count Louis 

Ah, scelerat ! 

The Vidame 
The talked-of Deputy for Vannes ? 

La F6 ret 

Tribune 
Eloquent as Antony ! 

Count Louis 
Demagogue ! 

The Englishman 
I heard him in the Jacobins. He spoke, 
And then they went and tore a palace down ! 

Count Louis 
Stucco ! 

Enter, laughing, Mlle. de Chateau-Gui, Melipars de 
L'Orient, and Captain Fauquemont de Buc. De 
L'Orient has in his hand a -paper of verses. 

My daughter and De L'Orient, 
Captain Fauquemont de Buc ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

Messieurs, mesdames ! 
The poet and his verses ! 

The Company 
Ah, verses ! 



OF REASON ii 

Count Louis 
Who is the fair, Monsieur de L'Orient? 
Lalage or Lais or little Fleurette ? 
Men sang of Celestine when I was young, — 
Ah, Celestine, behind thy white rose tree ! 

De L'Orient 
I do not sing of love, Monsieur le Comte ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
He sings of this day — 

De Buc 

The Eve of Saint John. 

De L* Orient 

It is a Song of Welcome to De Vardes ! 

De Buc 

But yesterday poor Colonel of Hussars ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
To-day Monsieur the Baron of Morbec ! 

De L'Orient 

Mars to Bellona leaves the tented field. 

De Buc 

That 's Bouille at Metz ! Kling ! rang our spurs — 
De Vardes' and mine — from Verdun to Morbec ! 

De L ' Orient 

The warrior hastens to his native weald. 



12 THE GODDESS 

Count Louis 
Would I might see again Henri de Vardes ! 

De Buc 

It would affright you, sir ! The man is dead. 

Count Louis 
Ah, while he lived it was as did become 
A nobleman of France and Brittany ! 
He was my friend; together we were young! 
From dawn to dusk, from dusk to dawn again, 
We searched for pleasure as for buried gold, 
And found it, too, in days when we were young! 
From every flint we struck the golden sparks, 
We plucked the thistle as we plucked the rose, 
And battle gave for every star that shone ! 
O nymphs that laughing fled while we pursued ! 
O music that was made when we were young ! 
O gold we won and duels that we fought ! 
On guard, monsieur, on guard ! Sa ! sa ! A touch ! 
What shall we drink ? Where shall we dine ? Mafoi ! 
'There 's a melting eye at the Golden Crown I 
The Angel pours a Burgundy divine ! 
Come, come, the quarrel 's oer ! So, arm in arm ! 
O worlds we lost and won when we were young ! 
O lips we kissed within the jasmine bower ! 
O sirens singing in the clear moonlight ! — 
With Bacchus we drank, with Apollo loved, 
With Actaeon hunted when we were young ! 
The wax-lights burned with softer lustre then. 
The music was more rich when we were young. 
Violet was the perfume for hair powder, 



OF REASON 13 

Ruffles were point and buckles were brilliant 
And lords were lords in the old land of France ! 
We did what we would, and lettres de cachet. 
Like cooing doves they fluttered from our hands ! 

De L' Orient 

Our tribute take, last of a noble line I 

Count Louis 
Women ! There will come no more such women ! 

De L ' Orient 

The laurel and the empress rose we twine. 

Count Louis 
And Henri 's gone ! And now his cousin reigns, — 
Rene de Vardes that hath been years away ! 
The King is dead. Well, well, long live the King ! 
They say he 's brave as Crillon, handsome too, 
With that bel air that no De Vardes 's without! 

Enter Mme. de Vaucourt followed by the Abbe Jean de 

Barbasan. 

m l l e . de chateau-gui 
Monsieur l'Abbe ! 

De Buc 
Madame de Vaucourt ! 

Mme. de Vaucourt {with outspread hands) 
You Ve heard? Last night they strove to burn Morbec ! 

All 

What? 



H THE GODDESS 

M M E . DE VAUCOURT 

The peasants ! 

Count Louis 

Again ! 

De Buc 

Ah, I am vexed. 
Messieurs, mesdames, the Baron of Morbec 
Silence enjoined, or the tale I 'd have told! 
The abbe is so bold — 

The Abbe 

De Buc 's so proud ! 
And just because he brought us help from Vannes ! 
The red Hussars to hive the bees again! 

The Englishman 
The seigneur and his peasants are at odds ? 

The Abbe 
Slightly! 

Count Louis (complacently) 
Henri was hated ! Hate descends 
With the land. 

De L' Orient 
There is a girl of these parts — 

Count Louis 
Eh? 

D e L'Orient 

She plays the firebrand. 



OF REASON 15 

Count Louis 
Bah! 

De L' Orient 

She hath 
The loveliest face ! 

Count Louis 
Hm! 

The Abbe 

I am unscathed. 
De Vardes is slightly wounded ! 

All 

Oh! 

Count Louis 

Morbleu ! 
And how did it happen, Monsieur l'Abbe? 

The Abbe 
Behold us at our ease in the great hall, 
De Vardes and I, a-musing o'er piquet! 
Voltaire beside us, for we read "Alzire," 
A wine as well, more suave than any verse ; 
A still and starlit night, soft, fair, and warm ; 
Wax-lights, and roses in a china bowl. 
He laid aside his sword and I my cap, 
All tranquilly at home, the Two Estates! 
He held carte blanche, I followed with quatorze. 
The roses sweetly smelled, the candles burned, 
At peace we were with nature and mankind. — 
A crash of painted glass ! a whirling stone ! 



16 THE GODDESS 

A candle out ! the roses all o'erturned ! 

The thunder of a log against our doors! 

A clattering of sabots! a sudden shout! 

Morbec, Morbec, it is thy Judgment Night ! 

Admission, admission, Aristocrats ! 

Red turns the night, the servants all rush in. 

Sieur ! Sieur ! the lackeys moan and wring their hands. 

Give, give! the terrace croaks. Burn, Morbec, burnt 

The great bell swings in the windy tower 

Till the wolves in the forest pause to hear. 

Fall, Morbec, fall! France has no need of thee ! 

Upsprings a rosy light! a smell of smoke! 

Mischief's afoot! The Baron of Morbec 

Lays down his cards and takes his rapier up, 

Hums Le Sein de sa Famille, shuts A hire, 

Resignedly rises — 

Count Louts (rubbing his hands) 
Expresses regret 
That monsieur his guest — 

The Abbe 

Should be incommoded 
And turns to the door. I levy the tongs. 
The seneschal Gregoire hauls from the wall 
An ancient arquebus ! The lackeys wail, 
And nothing do, as is the lackey's wont ! 
Again the peasants thunder at the door ! 
Open, De Vardes I Oh, hated of all names ! 
The new is as the old ! Death to De Vardes I 
The log strikes full, and now a panel breaks; 
In comes a hand that brandishes a pike ; 



OF REASON i 7 

A voice behind. We 've come to sup with thee ! 
For thou hast bread and we have none, De Vardes I 

The Englishman 
Ha, ha! ha, ha! ha, ha! 

Count Louis 

You laugh, monsieur? 

The Abbe 
I like calmness myself. Calm of the sea, 
Calm skies, the calm spring, and calmness of mind ! 
A tempest 's plebeian ! So I admired 
Rene de Vardes when he walked to the door 
And opened it ! Behold the whole wolf pack, 
As lean as 't were winter ! canaille all ! 
Sans-culottes and tatterdemalions, 
Mere dust of the field and sand of the shore ; 
Humanity's shreds would follow the mode, 
And burn the chateau of their rightful lord ! 
De Vardes* peasants in fine. Mort aux tyrans! 
A bas Aristocrat ! Vive la patrie! 
Vive la Revolution ! In they pressed, 
Gaunt, haggard, and shrill, and full in the front — 
Young and fair, conceive ! dark-eyed and red-lipped — 
A fury, a maenad, a girl called — 

De L'Orient 

Yvette ! 

The A b be" 
So they named her, the peasants of Morbec, 
Named and applauded the dark-eyed besom ! 



18 THE GODDESS 

When, De Vardes' drawn rapier just touching 
Her breast-knot of blue as she stood in his path, 
Up went her brown hand, armed with a sickle ! — 
De Vardes is a known fencer, — 't is lucky ! 
His wound is not deep, and in the left arm! 

The Vidame 
She may hang for that ! How high I forget 
The gallows should be — 

Count Louis (offering his snuff-box) 
Monsieur le Vidame, 
Thirty feet, I believe! 

The Vidame 

But not in chains — 

Count Louis 
No ! It was the left arm. 

De L j Orient 

What did De Vardes ? 

The Abbe 
De Vardes, with Liancourt and Rochefoucauld, 
Holds that the peasant doth possess a soul ! 
I think it hurt him to the heart that he, 
New come to Morbec, and unknown to these, 
His vassals of the village, field, and shore, 
Should be esteemed by them an enemy, 
A Baron Henri come again, forsooth ! 
But since 't was so, out rapier ! parry ! thrust ! 
Diable ! he 's a swordsman to my mind ! 



OF REASON 19 

The maenad with the sickle he puts by; 

Runs through the arm a clamourer of corvee, 

Brings howling to his knees a sans-culotte, 

And strikes a flail from out a claw-like hand ! 

They falter, they give way, the craven throng! 

The women cry them on ; they swarm again. 

His bright steel flashes, rise and fall my tongs ! 

But the lackeys are naught, and Gregoire finds 

A flaw in his musket; he will not fire ! 

Pardieu ! the things this Revolution kills ! 

There is no faithfulness in service now ! 

Our peasants grow bold. Ma foi ! we 're at bay ! 

De Vardes and De Barbasan, rapier, tongs ! 

Wild blows and wild cries, blown smoke and a glare, 

And the girl Yvette with her reaping hook 

Still pushed to the front by the women there ! 

Upon De Vardes' white sleeve the blood is dark, 

And his breath comes fast ! I see the event 

As 't will look in print in Paris next week, 

In UAmi du Peuple or Journal du Roil 

" The Vain Defence of an Ancient Chateau ! 

When we Burn so Much, why not Burn the Land ? " 

And I break with my tongs a young death's-head 

That 's bawling — What think you ? — Vive la Republique. 

Count Louis 
Death and damnation ! 

The Abbe 

So I said ! And then, 
Quite, I assure you, in time's very nick, 
The saint De Vardes prays to smiled on him ! 



2o THE GODDESS 

A thunder clap ! — Pas de charge I En avant ! 
Captain Fauquemont de Buc and his Hussars ! 

De Buc 

Warned by the saint, we galloped from Auray ! 

The Abbe 
Like the dead leaves borne afar on the blast, 
Or like the sea mist when the sun rises, 
Or like the red deer when the horn 's sounded, — 
Like anything in short that 's light o' heel, — 
Vanished our peasants ! The women went last; 
And last of all the maenad with the eyes ! 
Jesu ! She might have been Jeanne d'Arc, that girl ! 
The man who captures her has a hand full ! — 
To the deep woods they fled, are hunted now. — 
De Vardes and I gave welcome to De Buc, 
Put out the fire, attended to our wounds, 
Resumed our cards, and finished our Alzire — 
The Chateau of Morbec stands, you observe ! 

\Jfhe company applauds. 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
But who was the saint ? — 

De Buc 

Ah, here is De Vardes ! 

Enter De Vardes. He is dressed in slight mourning and 
carries his arm in a sling. 

The Guests 
Monsieur the Baron of Morbec ! 



OF REASON 21 

D e Var de s 

Welcome, 
The brave and the fair, my old friends and new ! 
Welcome to Morbec ! 

Count Louis 

Ah, your wounded arm ! — 
Our regret is profound ! 

De Vardes 
It is nothing. 
The fraternal embrace of the people ! 

Count Louis 
Oh, the people ! 

M M E . DE VAUCOURT 

The people ! 

De L' Orient 

The people ! 

Count Louis 
My friend, permit us to hope you will make 
Of the people a signal example ! 

De Vardes 
They are misguided. 

Count Louis 

Misguided ! Morbleu ! 

De Vardes 
I will talk to them. 



22 THE GODDESS 

Count Louis 
Monsieur le Baron, 
Let your soldiers talk with a bayonet's point, 
Your bailiffs with a rope — 

Mme. de Vaucourt 

But what good saint 
Brought warning to Auray ? 

De L' Orient 

I guess that saint ! 
\A lackey appears upon the terrace. 

The Lac key 

Madame la Marquise de Blancheforet ! 

The Guests 

Ah! 
La belle marquise ! 

Enter The Marquise. 

De Buc 

The saint ! 

De Var d es 

My neighbour fair, 

And to De Barbasan and me last night 
A guardian angel — [He greets The Marquise. 

Madame la Marquise ! 

The Marquise 
Monsieur le Baron ! 

(To the company.} Messieurs, mesdames ! 



OF REASON 23 

De Va r de s 
From Blancheforet to Auray through the night 
This lady rode — 

The Marquise (with gayety) 
Ah, how I rode last night, 
To Auray through the dark ! This way it was : 
I overheard two peasants yestereve 
As in a lane I sought for eglantine. 

"How long hath Morbec stood?" said one. "Too long! 
But when to-morrow dawns 't will not be there ! 
And we were born, I think, to burn chateaux ! — 
Ten, by the village clock — forget it not ! " 

The Abbe 
Ah, ay, the while I dealt the clock struck ten. 

The Marquise 
It was already dusk. — Like grey death moths 
They slipped away ! I knew not whom to trust, 
For in these times there 's no fidelity, 
No faithful groom, no steadfast messenger ! 
My little page brought me my Zuleika. 
I knew the red Hussars were at Auray, 
And that 't was said they loved their colonel well ! 
So to Auray came Zuleika and I ! 

De Buc 

We thought it was Dian in huntress dress ! 

De Vardes 
How deeply am I, Goddess, in thy debt ! 

No gold is coined wherewith I may repay ! 

[Music within. 



24 THE GODDESS 

The Marquise 
Give me a rose from yonder tree ! 

[Laughing voices within. 

M L L E . DE CHATEAU-GUI 

More guests, 
They 're on the south terrace ! 

De L* Orient 

Violins too ! 
Ah, the old air — [He sings. 

There lived a king in Ts y 

In Ts the city old! 
Beside the sounding sea 

He counted o'er his gold. 

De Vardes 

Let us meet them. 

[He gives his hand to The Marquise. Exeunt 
Count Louis, The Abbe, De Buc, De L'Orient, 
etc. Gregoire approaches De Vardes. 

Gregoire 
Monseigneur — Monsieur the Deputy ! 

D e Var d e s 

Ah! 
Say to monsieur I'm not at leisure now. 

[Exeunt De Vardes and The Marquise. The 
terrace and garden are deserted save for Gregoire, 
who seats himself in the shadow of the balustrade. 



OF REASON 25 

G RE GO I R E 

Humph ! — Monseigneur 's not at leisure. 

[He draws a Paris journal from his pocket and 
r e ads ^ following the letters with his forefinger. 

What news ? 
What says Jean Paul Marat, the People's Friend ? 

[A cry from the wood and the sound of breaking 
boughs. Yvette and Seraphine enter the garden. 
Raoul the Huntsman's voice within. 

The Huntsman 
Hilloa ! — Hilloa ! — Hilloa ! 

[Yvette and Seraphine turn towards one of the 
garden alleys. Laughter and voices. 

Yvette 

Go not that way! 

Seraphine 
There is no way ! 

The Huntsman {within) 
Hilloa! — Hilloa! 

Seraphine 

We re caught ! 
Yv ETTE 

The terrace there ! Behind the stone woman ! 

[They cross the garden to the terrace. 

Seraphine (She stops abruptly and points to the table) 
Bread ! 



26 THE GODDESS 

The Huntsman (nearer) 

Hilloa! — Hilloa! 

[Yvette and Seraphine turn from the table and 
hide behind the tall, ivy-draped pedestal of the 
statue, Gregoire looks upfront his paper and sees 
them. 

Enter Raoul the Huntsman. 

The Huntsman 

This way they came ! 

Gregoire (jerking his thumb over his shoulder) 
Down yonder path ! — plump to the woods again ! 

The Huntsman 
The Hussars from Auray have twenty rogues ! 

Gregoire 
Indeed ! 

The Huntsman 

These two and my bag 's full ! 

[Exit The Huntsman. 

Gregoire 

Diable ! 

[He reads aloud. 
Weary at last of intolerable wrong, 
'The peasants of Goy in Normandy rose 
And burned the chateau. Who questions their right? 

[He folds his paper. 
Saint Yves ! this stone is much harder than Goy ! 

[He looks fixedly at the statue and raises his voice. 
Ma'm'selle who would smile at the trump of doom, 



OF REASON 27 

I think that all the village will be hanged ! 

And at its head that brown young witch they call 

Yvette — 

Reenter De Vardes and The Marquise. 

De Vardes (/oGregoire) 

Begone ! 

[Exit Gregoire. De Vardes and The Marquise 
rest beside the statue, Yvette listening. 

Why, what 's a soldier for ? 
But pity me, pity me, belle Marquise ! 
Since pity is so sweet ! 

The Marquise 
I'm sure it is 
A fearful wound ! 

De Vardes 

A fearful wound indeed ! 
But 't is not in the arm ! 

The Marquise 
No, monsieur? 

De Vardes 

No! 

The heart ! I swear that it is bleeding fast ! 

And I have naught wherewith to stanch the wound. 

Your kerchief — 

The Marquise 
Just a piece of lace ! 



28 THE GODDESS 

De Vardes 

'Twill serve. 

The Marquise (giving her handkerchief} 
Well, there ! — Now tell me of last night. 

De Vardes 

Last night ! 
Why, all this tintamarre was but a dream, 
Fanfare of fairy trumpets while we slept. 
A night it was for love-in-idleness, 
And fragrant thoughts and airy phantasy ! 
There was no moon, but Venus shone as bright ; 
The honeysuckle blew its tiny horn 
To tell the rose a moth was coming by. 
Clarice-Marie I sang all the nightingales, 
Or would have sung were nightingales abroad ! 
Hush, hush ! the little waves kept whispering. 
The ivy at your window still was peeping; 
You lay in dreams, that gold curl on your breast! 

The Marquise 
No, no ! You cheat me not, monsieur ! Last night 

I did not sleep ! 

De Vardes 

Nor I! 

The Marquise 

Miserable brigands ! 

De Vardes 
No, not brigands ! Just wretched flesh and blood. 

The Marquise 
You pity them ? 



OF REASON 29 

De Vardes 
Ay. 

The Marquise 
Were I a seigneur, 
Lord of Morbec — 

De Vardes 

Were I a poor fisher, 
Sailing at sunrise home from the islands, 
Over the sea, and all my heart singing ! 
And you were a herd girl slender and sweet, 
With the gold of your hair beneath your cap, 
And you kept the cows and you were my douce > 
And you waved your hand from the green cliff head 
When the sun and I came up from the sea ! — 
And there was a seigneur so great and grim 
Who walked in his garden and said aloud, 
" How many fish has he taken for me ? 
Which of her cows shall I keep for myself ? 
I leave him enough to pay for the Mass 
The day he is drowned, and the girl shall have 
The range of the hills for her one poor cow ! 
Why should the fisher fret, the herd girl weep ? 
There is no reason in a serfs dull heart ! 
I might have taken all. It is my right ! " 
La belle Marquise, what would the herd girl do ? 
And should the fisher suffer and say naught ? 

The Marquise 
There is no fisher nor no herd girl here. 
How fair the roses of Morbec, monsieur ! 



3 o THE GODDESS 

De Vardes 
Ay, they are lovely queens. They know it too ! 
I better like the heartsease at your feet. 

The Marquise 
It is a peasant flower ! — Sieur de Morbec, 
Have you never loved ? 

De Vardes 

How fair is the day ! 
For loving how fit ! 'T is the Eve of Saint John. 

The Marquise 

Yes. 

De Vardes 

Last year I loved on this very day. 
Take the omen, madame ! 

The Marq u i se 

We had not met, 
You and I ! 

De Vardes 

Ah, 't is true ! We had not met ! — 
And so, fair as you are, you were not there, 
In Paimpont Wood, on the Eve of Saint John? 

The Marquise 
No! 

De Vardes 

I wonder who was ! 

The Mar q ui se 

In Paimpont Wood ! 
It is haunted ! 



OF REASON 31 

De Vardes 
On the Eve of Saint John 
I rode from Morbec here to Chatillon, 
And through the wood of Paimpont fared alone. 
It is a forest where enchantments thrive, 
And a fair dream doth drop from every tree ! 
The old, old world of bitterness and strife 
Is remote as winter, remote as death. 
It was high noon in the turbulent town; 
But clocks never strike in the elfin wood, 
And the sun's ruddy gold is elsewhere spent. 
The light was dim in the depths of Paimpont, 
Green, reverend, and dim as the light may be 
In a sea king's palace under the sea. 
The wind did not blow ; the flowering bough 
Was still as the rose on a dead man's breast. 
On velvet hoof the doe and fawn went by; 
In other woods the lark and linnet sang ; 
A stealthy way was taken by the fox; 
The badger trod upon the softest moss ; 
And like a shadow flitted past the hare. 
Without a sound the haunted fountain played. 
The oak boughs dreamed; the pine was motionless; 
Its silver arms the beech in silence spread; 
The poplar had forgot its lullaby. 
It was as still as cloudland in the wood, 
For in a hawthorn brake old Merlin sleeps, 
And every leaf is hushed for love of him. 
There through the years they sleep and listless dream, 
The wood of Paimpont and the wizard old. 
They dream of valleys where the lilies blow; 
They dream of woodland gods and castles high, 



32 THE GODDESS 

Of faun and Pan and of the Table Round, 
Of dryad trees and of a maiden dark — 
That Vivien whom old Merlin once did love, 
Vivien le Gai whose love was poisonous ! 

The Marquise 
I 've heard it said by women spinning flax, 
" Who wanders in Paimpont wanders in love ; 
Let him who loves in Paimpont Wood beware ! " 

D e Va r d e s 
Ah, idle word! Oh, many silver bells 
Since Vivien's day have rung, Beware, beware ! 
And rung in vain, for in every clime 
Lies Paimpont Wood, dawns the Eve of Saint John ! 

The Marquise 
And in the forest there whom did you love ? 

D e Var de s 
I do not know. I have not seen her since, 
Unless — unless I saw her face last night ! 

Y v e t t e {behind the base of the statue) 
Oh! — 

D e Var de s 

Did you not hear a voice? 

The Marquise 

*T is the wind. — 
You 're riding through the wood to Chatillon. 

De Vardes 
It was a lonely forest, deep and vast, 
A secret and a soundless trysting-place, 



OF REASON 33 

Where one might meet, nor be surprised to meet, 
From out his past, or from his life to come, 
A veiled shape, a presence bitter-sweet, 
A thing that was, a thing was yet to be ! 
It seemed a fatal place, a destined day. 
Down a long aisle of beechen trees I rode, 
And came upon a small and sunny vale, 
And there I met a face from out a dream, 
An ancient dream, a dark and lovely face. — 
Give me your fan of pearl and ivory ! 

[He takes the fan from The Marquise. 
I '11 turn enchanter, use it for my rod, 
And make you see, Marquise, the very place ! 

[He points with the fan. 
Here sprang the silver column of a beech; 
There, mossy knees of a most ancient oak; 
Yonder a wall of thickest foliage rose; 
And here a misty streamlet flowed 
With a voice more low than the dying fall 
Of a trouvere's lute in Languedoc, 
And on its shore the slender flowers grew; 
Upon a foxglove bell hung papillon; 
And all around the grass was long and fine. 
Within this sylvan space, ah, ages since ! 
The white-robed Druids in the cold moonlight 
Had reared an altar stone of wondrous height; 
The fane was there, the Druids were away. 
All fragrant was the air, and sunny still, — 
On the Eve of Saint John 't is ever so ! 
Above, the sky was blue without a cloud; 
The sun stood sentinel o'er the haunted wood. 
And there she lay, the woman of a dream, 



34 THE GODDESS 

Against the Druid Stone, amid the bloom; 

Her eyes were on the stream; she leaned her ear; 

From far away the trouvere played to her; 

In flakes of gold the sunlight blessed her hair; 

Her lips were red; she seemed a princess old; 

Mid purple bloom she lay and gazed afar, 

In the magic wood on a magic day, 

Listening to hear the mighty trouvere play. 

Was she a princess or a peasant maid ? 

I do not know, pardie ! She may have been 

That Vivien who wrought old Merlin wrong. 

I cannot tell if she were rich or poor ; 

I only saw her face ; I only know 

I loved the dream I met in Paimpont Wood 

As I did ride last year to Chatillon 

On Saint John's Eve. — 

\_He lays the fan upon the table. 

So I have loved, Marquise ! 

The Marquise 
What did your pretty dream ? 

De Vardes 

As other dreams; 

She fled ! 

The Marquise 

And you pursued ? 

D e Va r d e s 

Yes, but in vain ! 
Trouble no dream that is dreamed in Paimpont ! 
The wood closed around her ; she vanished quite. 
It must have been that evil Vivien, 
Since you, Marquise, have never trod the wood ! 



OF REASON 35 

The Marquise 
Would I have fled ? 

De Vardes 
Why, then, without doubt 
It was Vivien ! But yet do you know 
'T is the Eve of Saint John, and here, last night, 
I dreamed that I saw my dream again ! 

\jThe hand and arm of the statue fall > broken , to the 
ground at the feet of The Marquise. 

The Marquise 

Ah! 

De Vardes (pushes the marble aside with his foot) 
It is nothing ! The stone was cracked last night. 
Some crack-brained peasant had no better mark ! 

The Marquise 
'T is a presigne ! — I feel it. — 

De Vardes 

You shudder ! 

The Marquise 
One trod near my grave ! I 'm suddenly cold ! 

De Vardes 
The sun never shines on this terrace! 

The Marquise 

No! 
'T was an air from the Forest of Paimpont 
Came over me ! 

[Voices within. De L'Orient sings. 



36 THE GODDESS 

De L* Orient 

In Ts they did rejoice^ 
In Ts the wine was free ; 

'The Ocean lent its voice 
Unto that revelry ! 

The Marquise 

Oh, come away ! 
Let us find the violins and the sun ! 
There are other woods than Paimpont. Come away ! 

[Exeunt De Vardes and The Marquise. 

Y v e t t e {leaves the shadow of the statue) 
'T was he ! That horseman who did waken me 
That Saint John's Eve I strayed in Paimpont Wood ! 

Our Lady — 

Seraphine (from the statue) 
Saint Yves ! There is bread ! 
[Yvette takes from the table a loaf of bread and 
throws it to Seraphine, who springs upon it like a 
famished wolf. 

Ah — h — h ! [Setting her teeth in the loaf 

[Yvette, about to lay her hand upon another round of 
bread y sees the fan lying upon the cloth. She leaves 
the bread and takes up the fan. It opens in her hand. 

Yvette 
Oh! — 

[She sits in the great chair and waves the fan slowly 
to and fro. 

Were I a lady fair and free, 

1 would powder my hair with dust of gold, 



OF REASON 

I would clasp a necklace around my throat, 
Of jewels rare, and a gown I would wear, 
Blue silk like Our Lady of Toute Remede ! 
My shoes should be made of golden stuff, 
And a broidered glove should dress my hand, 
My hand so white that a lord might kiss ! 
I would spin fine flax from a silver wheel, 
I would weave a web for my bridal sheets, 
I would sing of King Gradlon under the sea, 
Were I a lady fair and free ! 

Enter Gregoire. 

Seraphine {from the statue) 
Yvette ! 
Y vette ! 

Yvette 
Peace, peace ! 

Gregoire 

What have you there ? 

Yvette 

A fan- 
So long I've wanted one ! 

Gregoire 

A fan, forsooth ! 
You cannot eat a fan, drink it, wear it ! 

Yvette 
I would look on 't. 

One day at Vannes the deputy's sister 
Showed me a fan, but it was not like this ! 



37 



38 THE GODDESS 

Oh, not like this with these wreaths of roses, 
These painted clouds, this fairy ship ! 

G R E GO I RE 

The price 
Would keep a peasant from starvation ! 
And belike it fell from the lifted hand 
Of Madame la Marquise de Blancheforet ! 

[The fan breaks in Yvette's hand. 

Seraphine {leaving the statue) 
Thou evil-starred ! 

Y v ETTE 
What have I done ? 

Gregoire 

Diantre ! 
Now you will be beaten as well as hanged ! 

Y v E T T E 

She called us miserable brigands ! 

Enter De Vardes. 

Seraphine 
Saint Yves! Saint Herve ! Saint Herbot ! 

De Vardes {to Gregoire) 

Voices ? 
Gregoire 

Monseigneur? 

De Vardes 
The fan of Madame la Marquise. 



OF REASON 39 

Gre go i re 

Monseigneur? 

De Vardes [perceiving Yvette and Seraphine) 
What will you have, good people ? 

Seraphine 
Saint Guenole ! Saint Thromeur ! Saint Sulic ! — 
He did not see us in the dark last night ! 

[De Vardes regards them more closely. 

Gregoire 
Seraphine Robin — Yvette Charruel — 
They are not bad folk, monseigneur ! 

Seraphine 

No, faith ! 
[De Vardes studies the name written upon a playing 
card which he holds in his hand. 

De Vardes (to Gregoire) 
Say to Monsieur the Deputy from Vannes 
That I await him here. 

[Exit Gregoire. De Vardes looks intently at 
Yvette. 

Yvette 

It was so beautiful, 
The fan — I took it in my hand — it broke ! 

Seraphine 
All that she touches breaks ! 

De Vardes (to Yvette) 

Wast ever thou 
In the Forest of Paimpont? 



40 THE GO DDES S 

Y V ETTE 

Oh, monseigneur ! 
Last Eve of Saint John, by the Druid Stone ! 

De Vardes 
Ah! — 

\He takes the fan from Yvette's hand and examines it. 
Beyond all remedy ! — Well, 't is done. 
Do not tremble so ! 

Y v ETT E 
I tremble not ! 

Enter Lalain. 

Seraphine {to Yvette) 
Here 's Monsieur Lalain ! 

Y V ETTE 

I care not, I ! 

De Vardes 

Ah, 
Remond Lalain! 

Lalain {stiffly) 
Monsieur — 

De Vardes 

A moment, pray, 
Until I Ve spoken with these worthy folk ! 

Lalain [coldly) 
Monsieur the Baron's pleasure ! 

[He moves aside, but in passing speaks to Yvette. 

Yvette ! Yvette ! 



OF REASON 41 

YVETTE 

Monsieur the Deputy ? 

La lain 

Too fair art thou ! 
Beware ! This is the Seigneur of Morbec ! 

Y v ETTE 
I know. 

L A L A I N 

He is the foe of France ! 

Y v ETTE 

I know. 

De Vardes (to Seraphine) 
Your business, well ? 

Seraphine (stammering) 

Our business, monseigneur ? — 
Oh, give me help, Saint Yves le Veridique ! — 
Our business ? — Saint Michel ! — Well, since we 're here ! — 
Monseigneur, was the pullet plump and sweet ? 

De Vardes 
The pullet ? 

Y v E TT E 
Our pullet, monseigneur. 

Lalain 

Distrained for rent ! 

Seraphine 

And Lisette, monseigneur? 

May we enquire for Lisette's health ? 

De Vardes 

Lisette ? 



42 THE GODDESS 

Y V E TT E 

Our cow, monseigneur. 

L A L A I N 

Taken for taxes ! 

Seraphine 
It was the best Lisette ! 

Y v ETT E 
She followed me 
Through the green lanes, and o'er the meadows salt. 
Her breath was sweet as May ! 

De Vardes 

It would please you 
To have your cow again ? 

Y VETTE 

Oh, monseigneur ! 
Monseigneur, I 'm the herd girl of Morbec ! 

L a l a i n [aside) 
They gaze into each other's eyes ! 

De Vardes 

What is 

Thy name ? 

Y v ETT E 

Yvette. 

Seraphine 
Ay, ay, 'tis so ! — Yvette. 
Called also The Right of the Seigneur ! — ■ 



OF REASON 43 

De Vardes 
The Right of the Seigneur ! 

Seraphine {nodding) 
Just so. 

Lalain [aside) 

Recall 
Just one of a great seigneur's privileges ! 
Baiser des mariees, in short, my friend ! 

Seraphine 

holy Saints ! the night that she was born ! 
The thunder pealed, the sea gave forth a cry, 
The forked lightnings played, the winds were out ! 
And in the hut her mother lay and wailed, 

And called on all the saints, the while Jehan 
(That was her mother's husband, monseigneur), 
He stood and struck his heel against the logs. 
Up flew the sparks, for all the wood was drift, 
Salt with the sea, and every flame was blue. 

1 held the babe — Yvette, show monseigneur 
The mark beneath the ear ! 

Yvette 

No! 

Seraphine 

Stubbornness ! 
T is there ! 

Lalain 
A birthmark — a small blue flower ! 



44 THE GODDESS 

De Vardes 
Ah! 

Seraphine 
Ay ! a little mark. — Jehan Charruel ! 
He was a violent man, — the sea breeds such ! 
He cursed Yvonne upon her pallet there, 
So pale she was, and dying with the tide ! 
He cursed the saints, the purple mark, the babe, 
And some one else I dare not name — 

L A L A I N 

I dare ! 
Henri-Etienne-Amaury de Vardes, 
Late Baron of Morbec ! 

Seraphine 

Then out he goes, 
A-weeping hard — Jehan — into the night. 
Ouf ! how it blew ! — 
The sea ran high, he met it in the dark, 
Was drowned ! Yvonne went with the ebb. Behold 
Yvette ! 

[Seraphine retreats to the t able > where she furtively 
drinks from a half-emptied wineglass. Lalain fol- 
lows her and the two talk together. 

De Vardes 
That purple flower, that violet 
By nature limned upon thy slender throat, — 
From north to south, from east to west \ is known ! 
A De Vardes bore that mark at Poitiers. 
The marshal, Hugues the Fair, and black Arnaud, 
The late baron — Why, what hast thou to do 



OF REASON 45 

With burning down chateaux to make a light 
To show the Morbihan that purple flower ? 

Y v ETT E 

Our Lady of Thorns ! 

De Vardes 

Herd girl too fair ! 
And vision of Paimpont, fair as I dreamed ! 
How fair was thy errand last night? 

Y v ETTE 

Monseigneur ! 
De Vardes 
In the ashes of Morbec what shouldst thou find? 

Y VETT E 

We only wished to make a little light — 
A little light to let the neighbours know 
That we were hungry ! 

De Vardes 

What neighbours hast thou ? 

Y v ET T E 

Normandy and Maine, Anjou and Poitou, 
The sea, the sky, and somewhat far away, 
The Club of the Jacobins at Paris. 

De Vardes 
Thy father was a nobleman of France ! 

Y VETTE 

1 never had a father, monseigneur ! 

I had a mother, and she loved, they say, 



46 THE GODDESS 

She dearly loved the fisherman Jehan ! 
When for the dead I pray, I pray for them. 

De Vardes 
How old art thou ? 

Y v E TT E 

How old ? Ah, let me see ! 

[She counts upon her fingers. 
The year the hailstones fell and killed the wheat; 
The year the flax failed and we made no songs; 
The year I begged for bread; the bitter year 
We buried Louison who died of cold, 
And Jacques was hanged who shot the seigneur's deer; 
The Pardon of Sainte Anne I had a gown; 
Came Angelique from Paris, told us how 
The wicked Queen was smiling, smiling there; 
Justine pined away, they shot Michel If, 
Down fell the Bastille, I learned Ca ira; 
The deputy came to the cure's house, 
Beside the deep blue sea I walked with him. 
A day there was at Vannes, a glorious day, 
When music played, and every banner waved, 
And all the folk went mad and rang the bells ! 
Vive la Revolution ! Vive Mirabeau ! 
Vive Remond Lalain I I wept when 't was o'er, 
Last summer was so fair ! I wandered far, 
One day I wandered through a darksome wood — 
Twas on the Eve of good Saint John, I know! 

De Vardes 
Ah — 

Y VETTE 

The summer fled, the light, the warmth did go, 



OF REASON 47 

The winter came that was so cruel cold, 

Cold as the dead ! And hunger, monseigneur, 

With bread at the chateau ! — Died Baron Henri. — 

The summer came again, the roses bloomed, 

The roses bloomed, but they were not for us ! 

For us the dank seaweed, the thorny furze. 

The lark sang well, but ah, it sang too high ! 

We could not lift our hearts to heaven's gate; 

We only heard the wind moan at our door. 

We cried to the saints, but they took no heed ! 

One told us what they did at Goy and Vannes, 

At Goy and Vannes, pardieu ! they helped themselves ! 

We heard there had come a new lord to Morbec, 

A soldier and a stranger to us all ! 

Three days have gone since I did sit alone 

Upon the cliff edge in the waving grass; 

The mew and curlew cried, the night wind blew, 

And in the sunset glow red turned Morbec ! 

I thought of my mother, I thought of France, 

I looked at the chateau cruel and high, 

And as I was hungry I ate my black bread! — 

I think, monseigneur, that I am nineteen. 

De Vardes 

Pauvre petite ! 

Yv ETT E 

Ah, poor indeed ! 

D e Vard e s 

How dark 
Thine eyes ! 

Y v ETTE 

My mother's were darker, they say ! 



48 THE GODDESS 

D e Vard e s 
Thy face is the face of a picture there. 

Yv ETT E 

I know — the Duchess Jeanne, who died for love. 

D e Vard e s 
Did Vivien teach thee magic in the wood ? 

Yv ETTE 
Monseigneur ? 

De Vard e s 

Pauvre petite! 

Yv ETTE 

O Our Lady ! 

The roses smell so sweet — 

[Lalain comes forward. 

Lalain 

I pardon crave, 
But I must sup to-night at Rennes. Please you, 
Release this peasant girl ! Affairs there are 
Of which I 'd speak — 

D e Vard e s 
Ay, presently! 

Lalain 

Now! 
D e Varde s 
Monsieur! 

Lalain 

Citoyen Rene-Amaury Vardes — 



OF REASON 49 

D e Vard e s 
Is that, monsieur, the latest Paris mode ? 
Citoyen Rene-Amaury Vardes y 
The De left off, our hats (Glances at Lalain) left on ! 

Lalain {removing his hat) 

Monsieur 
The Baron of Morbec ! 

De Vardes (bowing) 
Monsieur 
The Deputy for Vannes ! 

[Laughter and voices within. 

Enter from the chateau The Marquise and Mlle. de 
Chateau-Gui with De L'Orient and De Buc. 

De L'Orient ( s ^ n g s ) 
'Then spake the king ofTs 

Above the song and shout , 
Bring here the golden key 

That keeps the ocean out I 



My lost fan ! 



The Marquise 

Monsieur le Baron, 

Y v e T T e (aside) 
Oh me! 



D e Va r d e s 

Madame la Marquise, 
I will give you a fan that 's to my taste ; 
By Watteau painted, mounted by Laudet, 



50 THE GODDESS 

Fragile and fine, an Adonis of fans ! 
This that I broke I will keep for myself. 

[Pockets the fan. 
Forgive the mere accident! 

Yv ETTE 

Ah! 

Seraphine {from the table) 

Ah— h— h ! 



L A L a i N {aside) 

If I forgive! 

The Ma rqui s e 

At Blancheforet, monsieur, 
The Watteau, Laudet, Adonis of fans, 
I '11 take from your hand — 

De Vard e s 

I ride there anon, 
{Aside.) But not through the Forest of Paimpont 
And not on the Eve of Saint John. 

Th e Marquis e 

Come soon, 
My garden is sweetest in June. 

De L ' Orient {sings) 
In Ts they sing no more> 

In Ts the city old! 
'The waves are rolling o f er 

The king and all his gold. 



Gods! 



OF REASON 51 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
Look at my fan, Monsieur le Baron! 

[Lalain crosses to Yvette. 

Lalain 
Hast thou forgot, hast thou forgot, Yvette, 
Thy part, thy lot, the very name they give thee ? 
This is Morbec, this is the brazen castle! 
There are no roses here. 

Yvette 

So generous 
He was! 

Lalain 

Generous ! Oh, well are you called 
The Right of the Seigneur ! 

Yvette {passionately) 

Give me not that 
Detestable name! 

Lalai n 

So meek under wrongs — 

Yv ette 
Oh! 

Lalain 

So quick to forget — 

Yvette 
Oh! 

Lalain 

La patrie — 
Sworn oaths — the tricolour — 



52 THE GODDESS 

Y V ETT E 

Anger me not! 

L ALAIN 
On your lips Qa Ira ! but in your heart 

Richard, O mon Roi ! 

Yvette 
'T is false! 

L AL AI N 

And I — and I — Yvette ! 

Yvette 

Speak not to me ! 

Lalain 
You gaze at that man! I tell you he wooes 
Madame la Marquise de Blancheforet! 

[Yvette crosses to The Marquise, De Vardes, 
and the guests. 

Yvette {to The Marquise) 

Madame! 

1 broke the fan ! I would pay if I might. 

I would keep your cows, or spin your flax — 

The Marqui s e 

The fan ! 
You broke the fan — not monsieur there ! 

Yvette 

No, I! 
Th e Marquise 

Sainte Genevieve! 



OF REASON 53 

Enter Count Louis, The Vidame, Mme. de Vaucourt, 

etc. 

S ERAPHINE 

Yvette ! 

Count Louis 

La belle Marquise! 

[Seraphine draws Yvette back to the base of the 
statue. Count Louis, The Marquise, and the 
guests talk together. Lalain crosses to De Vardes. 

Lalain 
Rene de Vardes! 

D e Vard e s 

Remond Lalain! 

Lalain 
This day I bury our friendship of old ! 

D e Varde s 
So! 

Lalain 
I owe to you a thousand louis 
Which I '11 repay, monsieur ! 

De Vard e s 

I doubt it not. 

Lalain 
Touch not the girl Yvette ! 

D e Vard e s 
At last the heart of the matter ! I see 
You have been through the Forest of Paimpont. 



54 THE GODDESS 

Lalain 
Or touch at your peril ! 

De Vard e s 
Monsieur! 

Lalain 

Oh, if 
You lay your hand upon your sword, monsieur, 
I 'm for you there ! 

D e Vard e s 
Art mad, or drunk with power, 
Monsieur the favourite of the Jacobins ? 

Lalain 
There '11 come a day when to be Jacobin 
Is something more, monsieur, than to be king! 

D e Vard e s 
Indeed ! 

\_A Sergeant of Hussars appears on the terrace and 
salutes. 
Sergeant ! 

The S erge ant 
My Colonel ! 

De Vard es 

Well, your report. 

The S erge ant 
My Colonel, wood and shore we Ve searched since dawn, 
And twenty bitter rogues we Ve found, no less ! 



OF REASON 55 

They crouched behind the tall grey stones, or lay 
Prone in the furze, or knelt at Calvaries! 
Two women remain — 

[He stares at Yvette and Seraphine. 

Seraphine 

O Saint Thegonnec ! 
Saint Guirec ! Saint Servan ! 

Yvette 

O Our Lady ! 

Enter The Abbe. 

The Abbe 
De Vardes, your precious peasants — [He sees Yvette. 

Who is here? 
The De Mericourt, the maenad, I swear ! 
Who wounded De Vardes ! 

Yv ETTE 

Oh! — 

Mme. de Vaucourt 

The Egyptian ! 

Seraphine 
Monseigneur, monseigneur, she 's none of mine ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
The poor girl ! 

S E RAP HINE 

Ah, mademoiselle, it is 
The innocentest creature ! 



5 6 THE GODDESS 

The Abbe [touches Yvette upon the cheek) 

Good-morning, 
My dear ! 

Count Louis 
Hm — m — m! — pretty ! 

The Vidame 

Certainly the gallows 
Should be thirty feet high. 

Count Louis 

Hm — m — m ! Something less, 
Monsieur le Vidame ! 

Lalain 
Diable! 

D e V a r d e s [to the sergeant) 
Where are your captives ? 

The Sergeant 

My Colonel, 
I have them safely here ! Ha ! you within ! 

\Enter from the hall of the chateau soldiers and 
huntsmen with peasants, men and women; some 
sullenly submissive, others struggling against their 
bonds, 'They crowd the terrace before the great 
doors. The guests of De Vardes to the right and 
left upon the terrace, the stairs, and in the garden. 
Yvette and Seraphine beside the statue; Lalain 
near them; De Vardes with his hand upon the 
great chair. 

Mme. de Vaucourt 
Oh, the brigands ! 



OF REASON 57 

Count Louis (rubbing his hands) 

Here, Sergeant, range them here, 
Upon the terrace ! And take the great chair, 
De Vardes ! Ma foi ! We will teach them, the rogues ! 
Monsieur 1' Anglais, have you peasants at home 
Plague you at times ? — Word of a gentleman ! 
It seems like old days and Henri again ! 

\jthe soldiers thrust their prisoners forward with 
the butts of their muskets. 

A Man 
Monseigneur ! 

Another 

Monseigneur ! 

A Woman 

Madame la Marquise ! 
My father was your father's foster brother ! 

The Marquise 
Is that a reason you should burn chateaux ? 

A Young Woman 
Where 's Yvette Charruel ? 

Yv ETTE 

Here, Angelique ! 

Seraphine (aside to Angelique) 
Of course ! Betray the girl ! I knew you would. 

An Old Woman 
Yvette said God would have mercy ! I faint — 



58 THE GODDESS 

De Vardes (/o Gregoire) 

Give her wine ! 

A Peasant 

See ! There is Remond Lalain ! 

La LAI N 
Patience, compatriot ! Thursday I speak 
In the Jacobins ! 

An gelique 

Ah, monseigneur ! 
Ah, monseigneur, there 's she who led us here ! 
There 's she who said the shadow of Morbec 
Blackened the land as sin blackens the soul ! 

The Guests 
Ah! — 

Ang elique 

That same Yvette, who said, monseigneur, 
That delving the earth, the peasants of France 
In a long age had delved up a thought ! 

The Guests 

Ah! — 

Angelique 
She said that we were never born to starve ! 
She said the seigneur's dues were all infame ! 

The Guests 
Ah! — 

The Vidame 

Burn the witch ! 

De Vard e s 

Have you done ? 



OF REASON 59 

Angelique 

Monseigneur, 

She said the forest deer, the hare, the birds, 

Were just as much the peasant's as the lord's ! 

The Englishman 

What? What? 

Angelique 

She said the saints they wished no tithes ! 

The Ab b e 
I give her up ! 

Angelique 

Monseigneur, monseigneur, 
She said that all our hope was the tricolour ! 

De Buc 

O lilies of Bourbon ! 

Seraphine {to Angelique) 
Thou little beast ! 

Angelique {shrilly) 
Yvette said bitter hunger, cold, and want 
Came with noblesse and with noblesse would go ! 
Yvette said the Queen was an Austrian ! 
Yvette said the King was a faineant ! 
Yvette said the princes were traitors ! 
Yvette said the armies would turn to us ! 
Yvette heard the drums of the Republic ! 

The Guests 
Out! 



60 T HE GO DDES S 

Cou nt Louis 
Enough ! 

Seraphine 

Thou hellicat ! 

A Peasant 

Monseigneur ! 
Saint Yves le Veridique knows it is truth ! 
She ever rings the tocsin in our hearts ! 

Anoth e r 
Yvette Charruel ! 

A Woman 

She led us here ! 

Another Woman 

Yvette ! 
Yvette Charruel ! 

Ang elique 

Yvette ? — 

[Several of the women laugh. 

D e Va rd e s 

Why, you are all cowards ! 

Seraphine 
So they are, monseigneur, so they are ! 

D e V a r d e s {to the peasants) 

Who speaks for you ? 

\_A silence. 
Th e Peasants 

Monseigneur — monseigneur — 

[They break off. De Vardes stands waiting for 
them to speak, his hand upon the chair. 



OF REASON 61 

An Old Woman 
Yvette — 

An Old Man 
Yvette — 

The Peasants 

Monseigneur — 

[They break off. They make a sighing sound. The 
old woman begins to say her beads. 

Yvette 

Monseigneur, 
They are so hungry ! Monseigneur, 't is said 
You are a soldier and have been to war! 
Oh, to us all there comes one battle-field 
When we must look into a conqueror's eyes ! 
Think then upon that last dark plain and show 
Mercy to us who in the shadow stand ! 
We are your enemies ! 

De Buc 

Faith of an officer ! 
De Vardes — 

Yvette 

The children are crying at home, 
Monseigneur ! 

A Woman 
O Sainte Vierge, have pity ! 

Yvette 
With bowed heads the old men wait ! 



62 THE GODDESS 

A Woman 

Oh, my father! 
Y v ETTE 

The young men hear the ravens crying ! 

The Peasants 

Aie! — 

YVETTE 

The nets are dry, the red sails laid away, 
And all the boats lie idle by the shore. 

A Fi s H E RM AN 
Star of the Sea ! Pray for poor fisherfolk ! 

A Peasant 

I left my sickle in the standing corn. 

Yv ETTE 
The wheat must fall, the flax be gathered soon, 
Or else we '11 sing no songs in Morbihan ! 

The Peasants 
Aie ! The songs of the diskanerien ! 

Y v ETT E 
The hearths are cold and the wheels turn not, 
And Hunger sits on every doorstep ! 

The Peasants 

Aie! — 

Y V ETT E 

To-morrow is the Pardon of the Birds. 

The birds go free — the birds go free, monseigneur ! 



OF REASON 63 

De Buc 

And so I swear should you ! 

The Peasants 

The birds go free ! 

A Woman 
My little bird at home ! 

The Marqui s e 

Give her, monsieur, 
Another fan to break ! 

Y v ETT E 
Not one of yours, 
Madame la Marquise ! 

D e V a r d e s (to the sergeant) 
Give them liberty. 

The Sergeant 
My Colonel P 

D e Vard e s 
Cut their bonds ; set them free ! 
Make way for them there ! 

(To the peasants.) Peasants of Morbec ! 
Last night you rose against your lord and strove 
To burn his house, to slay his guest and him. 
How shall he speak to you to-day? Poor fools ! 
Distraught and blind you struck ere that you looked, 
And struck at one who fain would be your friend, 
Who has his vision of a seigneur's right! 
These are the towers of Morbec, but I 
Am not Baron Henri, blind that ye are ! 



64 THE GODDESS 

1 am Baron Rene, remember my name. 
Bread you shall have, I will think of your wrongs. 
No foe am I ! There are the open doors. 
Back to the village go! but look you well. 
Mistake no more, it will be dangerous ! 
Creep not this way again in the dark night, 
Or you may meet an ancient Lord of Morbec ! 
More loyal grow, cease all your traitorous talk, 
Raise not Rebellion's head or it will find 
A soldier of the King with armed heel ! 
Mistake no more ! This once I pardon you. 
Begone ! The fields await you and the wind 
Sits fair for Quiberon ! Begone. 
(To Yvette and Seraphine.) Stay ! 

[The peasants press in confusion toward the doors 
of the chateau. 

The Peasants 
Live Baron Rene ! 

L ALA IN 

O Breton fools ! — Yvette ! 
[Yvette does not answer. She looks atT)E Vardes. 

The Marquise (with strained laughter) 
High justice at Morbec ! 

The Vid ame 

Mille diables ! 
The wretches all go free ! 

Count Louis 

Is this Morbec? 



OF REASON 

Mort de ma vie ! What is it that you do, 
Monsieur le Baron de Morbec ? 

D e Vard e s 

My pleasure, 
Monsieur le Comte de Chateau-Gui, upon 
My peasants of Morbec ! 

CUR TAIN 



65 




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ACT II 

The garden of the Convent of the Visitation at Nantes. 
Long lines of fruit trees which appear to sleep in the sun- 
shine. In the middle of the garden a stone fountain, where 
rises and falls a little jet of water. To the left the white 
buildings of the convent ; in the background, between the 
convent and the street, a high garden wall, the tops of 
trees, and the roof and spire of a church. There is a 
barred door in the wall. The doors and windows of the 
convent parlour giving upon the garden are open. It is 
the summer of 1792. 

A nun appears for a moment at the door of the convent, 
then vanishes, and De Vardes and Yvette enter the 
garden. 

De Vard e s 



w 



HAT hast thou learned to-day ? 
Yvette 



In history: 



The battles of Rossbach and of Minden ! 
The Peace of Paris — 

De Vard e s 
Indeed ! 



Yvette 

Philosophy : 
Man is born free — but who will break his chains ? 



68 THE GODDESS 

D e Vard e s 
It is a question truly ! 

YVETTE 

Theology : 
God is the father of us all — and yet 
I think I know how feels an orphan child ! 

D e Vard e s 
Defeat of France, Rousseau, and Modern Doubt ! 
And hast thou learnt all this in convent walls ? 

Yvette 
No! 

D e Vard e s 

They are good to thee, the Sisters all ? 

Yvette 
Monseigneur, yes ! 

De Vard e s 
When I did place thee here 
After that day thou didst not burn Morbec ! 
I gave the Reverend Mother straitest charge, — 
This convent oweth much to the De Vardes. 
They have enriched it oft, and it in turn 
Refuge hath given unto noble dames. 
Oft did she sit beside the fountain there, 
That Duchess Jeanne whose look thou wearest now ! 

Yvette 
Oh! — 

De Vardes 

How mournfully thou sighest ! Yet 



OF REASON 69 

How glorious are thine eyes this lovely day ! 
Thou 'rt well, and thou art happy, art thou not ? 

Yvette 
There is no hunger here, no cold, no care ! 
I ever wished to learn and here I learn, 
Here where the Duchess Jeanne did sit forlorn, — 
And then I pray within the chapel there, 
And then I count the stars as they are lit, — 
And then I think of all the lights of Nantes ! 

De Vard e s 
It hath been many days I Ve been away, 
To Morbec and to Vannes and to Vitre. 

Yvette 
I thought that thou wouldst never come again ! 

D e Vard e s 
Didst think the night had ceased to long for day? 
Didst think the tide no more obeyed the moon ? 
The reed no longer bowed unto the wind ? 

Yvette 
Ah, do not jest ! — There 's blood upon thy coat ! 

De Vard e s 
'T is nothing ! — We have had hard words to-day, 
My men and I ! \_He gazes around at the quiet garden. 

O holy peace ! O balm ! 
O green and sunny quietude ! Outside 
There 's tumult, heat, confusion, enmity ! 
Here is a haven, here 'tis blissful sweet ! 

[They sit upon the marge of the fountain. 



7 o THE GODDESS 

All is dismay and doubt in France to-day. 

With troubled eyes men question destiny ! 

Outside I front the storm as best I may, 

But here is anchorage profound and fair — 

There fruit trees drifting bloom, this fountain marge ! 

Y v ETTE 
I better love the wild and desolate shore ! 

De Vard e s 

What is that ribbon closed within thy hand ? 

[Yvette opens her hand and shows a ribbon cockade. 

The tricolour ! 

Yv ETTE 

Wilt thou not wear it ? 

De Vard e s 

No! 
Yvette 
It was my favour — Fare you well, monsieur ! 

De V ard e s 
I might not wear that ribbon, no, not if 
It were thy favour truly, Vivien ! 
Ah, when will cease this discord of our minds ? 
Wilt thou forever be a Jacobin ? 

[A distant bugle, followed by a roll of drums and 
martial music. 

Yvette 

Aux armes, Citoyens ! 
Formez vos bataillons ! 



OF REASON 71 

De Vard e s 
Where learned'st thou the Marseillaise ? 

Y VETT E 

'T is in the air ! Oh, on these moonlight nights 
I dream of France and how he spoke to me 
Of all the wrongs of France we should redress ! 

D e Vardes 
Who spoke to thee ? 

YVETTE 

Remond Lalain. 

De Varde s 
Remond Lalain was once my closest friend. 
He travels now a dark and winding way ! 

Yvette 
Where is she now, that lady bright and fair 
Who 's named La Belle Marquise in Morbihan ? 



She is in Nantes. 



Most fair. 



De Vardes 

Yvette 
Ah ! — Is she not fair ? 

De Vardes 



Yvette 
And nobly born ? 

De Vardes 

And nobly born. 



72 THE GO DDESS 

Y V ETTE 

Alas ! 

Enter Sister Benedicta. 

Sister Benedicta 
Monsieur le Baron de Morbec, — 
A courier, in haste, foam-flecked and spent, 
Demands to speak with you. 

D e Vard e s 

What tidings now ? 
Ill news like ravens to a cumbered field 1 
I come, my Sister ! 

(To Yvette.) I '11 return. 

[Exeunt De Vardes and Sister Benedicta. 

Yvette 

Alas! 
She is in Nantes ! He sees her every day. 
What is this pain that 's tearing at my heart? 

[Laughing voices of young girls. Enter from the 
convent Sister Fidelis and Sister Simplicia 
with a cluster of young girls , pupils of the nuns or 
refugees from Royalist families. They seat them- 
selves upon the wide steps of the fountain. Yvette 
leans against the basin and plays in the water with 
her hand. 

A Young Girl (/o Yvette) 
We 're telling stories ! 

Anoth e r 
Finish thine, Louise ! 



OF REASON 73 

Louise 
'T is told. The beau prince wed the belle princesse, 
And they lived happily ever after ! 

A Young Girl 

Whose turn now? 

Anoth e r 

Tell us a story, Yvette ! 

Y v E T t e (turning from the fountain) 
Beneath the halfway tree, 
J< Tween Josselin and Pont ivy, 
Suddenly, out of the dark, 
I heard a grey wolf bark ! 

Hoee ! Hoee ! Hoee ! 

'the snow was on the ground, 
The shadows all around, 
Laid a finger on my lip, 
As I stood, hand on hip, 
Listening the grey wolf bark. 

Hoee ! Hoee ! Hoee ! 
Beneath the halfway tree, 
'Tween Josselin and Pont ivy ! 

A little child came by. 
" Tvette, the wolf is nigh ! 
Tvette, take thou me up, 
I 've neither bite nor sup ! " 

Hoee ! Hoee ! Hoee ! 

The child came to my arm. 
He was so fair and warm ! 



74 THE GODDESS 

The child came to my arm, 
I kept him safe from harm ! 

Hoee! Hoee ! Hoee! 



A light grew round his head, 
I felt all cheered and fed. 
" Yvette, have thou no fear ! 
Who giveth aid, to me is dear I " 

Hotel Hoee! Hoee! 
The child no longer pressed, 
White snow lay on my breast ! 

The grey wolf ran away, 

Ho'ee! Ho'ee ! Ho'ee ! 
There broke a splendid day, 
Beneath the halfway tree, 
y Tween Josselin and Pontivy ! 



A miracle ? 



Sister Fidelis 

Yvette 
I do not know. 



A Young Girl 
I liked best 
The beau prince and the belle princesse. 

Another Girl 

Oh, 
Thou 'rt an Aristocrat ! 

[The young girls return to their embroidery. Yvette 
plays in the water of the fountain with her hand. 



OF REASON j$ 

YVETTE 

Gold fish, gold fish, 
How are the fish of Quiberon ? 

A Young Girl 
Were I 

A fairy prince, then my princess should be 
Madame la Marquise de Blancheforet ! 

Anoth er 

If I 

Were a princess, I would have for my prince 

Monsieur le Baron de Morbec. 

[Yvette turns from the fountain. 

A Third Girl 

They say 
That in all France there 's none more brave than he ! 
And far and near she 's called La Belle Marquise ! 
A little while and there '11 a wedding be ! 

The First 
But then, the poor Yvette ! He is, you know, 
Her prince ! 

Yvette {plough. 

Oh, mockery ! 

Sister Fidelis 

Hush, children, hush ! 
Monsieur le Baron is her benefactor ! 

Sister Simplicia 
He plucked her from the dreadful world outside ! 



jb THE GODDESS 

Sister Fidelis 
He placed her here beneath Our Lady's care. 

Sister Simplicia 
In everything he is her truest friend ! 

Sister Fidelis 
But for his condescension, ah, who knows 
What in these fearful days might be her lot ! 
Here in this fold she 's safe. 

Yvette (aside) 

Alas ! alas ! 

A Young Girl 
Oh, she is fairer than the fairy queen ! 
Clarice de Miramand and Blancheforet ! 

Yvette (aside) 
Is she so fair? Is she so fair indeed? 
I broke her fan — now she will break my heart ! 

A Yo ung Girl 
He is a knight like Lancelot ! 

Yv ette 

Oh me ! 
She is the Queen, she is that Guinevere ! 

[Distant music, 'The noise of footsteps and voices in 
the street beyond the wall, 

A Young Girl 
Oh, outside the wall what is there passing ? 



OF REASON 77 

Sister Fidelis {severely) 
We have nothing to do with outside the wall. 

A Young Girl {indicating the door in the wall) 
Might we open the door a little way ? 

Sister Fidelis 

The blessed saints forbid ! 

\_From the street are heard the drums and fifes of 
passing National troops, The bayonets of the soldiers 
are visible above the wall. 

Voices {in the street) 
A lions, enfants de la patrie, 
Le jour de gloire est arrive ! 

A Yo ung Girl 

Oh, soldiers ! 
Another 

Were the wall only down ! 

[The circle about the fountain breaks. 'The young 
girls walk up and down beneath the trees. The Sis- 
ters watch them from a garden bench. The music 
dies away. Yvette sits upon the stone marge of the 
fountain. 

Yvette 
What is this pain that 's tearing at my heart ? 
What matters it to me whom he doth love ? 
And what concern of mine that she is fair ? 
I would she were not so ! — Oh, misery ! 
She is in Nantes, she is La Belle Marquise ! 
I would that she were dead ! [The chapel bell rings. 

O Seigneur Dieu ! 



yS THE GODDESS 

Her death ! I do not wish her death ! Not I ! 

Our Lady ! let not ill thoughts possess me ! 

1 would I were at Morbec this still eve, 
Herding the cows amid the golden broom, 
Above a sea of glass without a wind, 

As stagnant calm as is this prisoned water ! 

I would gather the musk rose in the lane, 

I would tread the wet sand and count the ships, 

My brow would not burn, my heart would not ache, 

No tears from my eyes would I wipe away ! 

Why should they not fall like the winter rain ? 

I am the herd girl here as at Morbec, 

And she 's a great lady, loved for herself! 

O love! is it love that stifles me so? 

love ! is it love that makes me weep ? 

1 thought that love was all splendour and light, 
The bow in the sky, the bird at its height, 
The glory and state of an angel bright ! 
What is this pain that burdens all my heart ? 

[She bows her head upon her knees. 'The hum of the 
street deepens to a continuous and sinister sound. 
In the distance a roll of drums. Yvette raises her 
head. 

I sit by this fountain, he '11 not return ! 

He cares not for me, — he 's the Sieur de Morbec, 

And I a herd girl wandering through his fields ! 

Mother, my mother, did you sit and wait, 

By the wild sea rim on a glowing eve, 

Mid the brown seaweed on the shining sands? 

Your heart did it beat, and your senses swim ? — 

But your lover, the fisher, he came, he came ! 

[The voice of the street deepens. 



OF REASON 79 

I will not have this pain ! I '11 tear it out ! 

[Her hand touches the purple mark on her throat. 

Ha! how burns this hateful mark to-day! 

\jfhere comes from the church towers of Nantes a 
sudden and violent crash of bells. 

Sister Fidelis (rising) 
The tocsin ! 

The Young Girls (They flutter forward to the 

fountain) 

The tocsin ! Oh, the tocsin ! 
Like a hive of bees hums the street without ! 

Y v ETTE 
Oh, all ye iron bells ! ring on ! ring on ! 

Enter Mlle. de Chateau-Gui and Sister Benedicta. 

The Young Girls 
Here is Mademoiselle de Chateau-Gui! 
She '11 tell us why the bells are ringing! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

O Ciel ! 
Would you believe it? O blessed saints above! 
The country is in danger! 

A Young Girl 

Oh! we thought 
You brought us news ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui [joyously) 
Do you not hear the bells ? 



8o THE GODDESS 

Oh, such a day outside ! It is proclaimed ! 

La patrie est en danger ! [Distant trumpets. 

Well you may wail, 
You brazen trumpets of the Revolution ! 
The Duke of Brunswick he is marching now, 
And with him all our nobles back from Coblentz ! 
O bliss ! La patrie est en danger ! 

Sister Fidelis 

Oh, hush ! 
The very walls have ears ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
My father says 
The King shall have his own again, and all 
Will go as merry as a wedding bell ! 
La patrie est en danger ! 

Enter Count Louis, Melipars de L'Orient, and the 
Abbe de Barbasan. 

Oh, here are 
My father and Monsieur de L'Orient ! 

De L'Orient 
So sweet the flowers here — 

Count Louis (to the young girls) 
Mesdemoiselles, 
One garden of rosebuds time hath not touched ! 
(To the Sisters.) In your prayers, my Sisters, name Cha- 
teau-Gui ! 

[The young girls curtesy, then exeunt between the 
trees. Yvette remains beside the fountain. Count 
Louis looks at her through his glass. 
Ha! 



OF REASON 81 

De L'Orient 
The herd girl of Morbec ! 

Count Louis 

I have eyes, 
De L'Orient! 

The Abbe 
Hm ! — Fair child ! 

Y v E T T E (coldly) 

Citoyen ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

Monsieur de L'Orient, you promised me 
My father should not walk abroad to-day ! 

D e L'Orient 

What could I do ? He is so young and rash ! 

Count Louis (taking snuff) 
'T is true that Nantes is dangerous to-day 
To all save those wild beasts the sans-culottes ! 
But that 's no reason I should stay at home. 
Where is De Vardes ? His man said he was here. 
It is his wont, pardieu ! 

Sister Fidelis 

Monsieur le Comte, 
Monsieur the Baron of Morbec did come 
To see that all was well with this our charge — 
A peasant girl, monsieur, whom he did save 
From cold and hunger and ill company. 



82 THE GODDESS 

But now she prospers and we think that he 
Will come no more. 

Yv ETTE 

Jesu Maria ! 

Count Louis (with satisfaction) 

Ma foi ! 
He is a soldier is De Vardes ! He camps 
One day beside the hedgerow in the field ! 
The next he 's for some royal mount of love, 
High as the snow and splendid in the sun ! 
Since he 's not here I know where else he is ! 

De L ' Orient (sings) 
Mignonne y Mignonne ! 
Kiss me, rose of to-day I 

Y v E TT E 
O heart ! O world ! O hedgerow in the field ! 

Count Louis 
Well, well, her mother was as fair as she ! 
Clarice de Miramand, long-dead Clarice ! 
Her hair was golden too. — Old times, old times ! 
And now it is De Vardes and the Marquise ! 

[Count Louis, Mlle. de Chateau-Gui, and De 
L'Orient walk up and down beneath the trees, De 
L' Orient sings, 

De L'Orient 
Mignonne, Mignonne I 

The red rose fades away ! 
Mignonne, Mignonne! 

The white rose will not stay ! 



OF REASON 83 

Th e Ab b e 
My dear, that is a pretty wrist of thine ! 

Y VETTE 

Citoyen ! 

The Abbe 

Hast said thy rosary to-day ? 

Yv ette 
Citoyen ! 

The Abb e 

A melting eye ! 

Yvette 
Citoyen ! 

The Abbe 

Dame ! She is only good to burn chateaux! 

[He joins Count Louis, etc. 'They walk and talk 
beneath the trees. 

Yv ETTE 

The high of heart bide no man's scorning ! I 
Will break these bonds ! I will be free ! I will ! 
O royal mount of love, snow-high, sun-kissed, 
Kissed by the sun which once did shine on me ! 
If I am of the fields — 

[Her hand touches the mark upon her throat. She 
laughs. 

O hated flower, 
Which grew beneath no hedgerow on this earth ! 
Teach me, thou poison blossom, pride of heart ! 
Where is that Duchess Jeanne whom I am like ? 
They say for love her heart did rive in twain, 



84 THE GO DDESS 

But now she smiles beside a shadowy stream 
In some far land where none do die of love ! 
And where is he, Jehan the fisherman, 
Who loved Yvonne, who met the sea and died ? 
They died for love who should have lived for hate ! 
I '11 live — 
Enter De Vardes. Count Louis, etc., come forward. 

Oh, here 's the soldier ! Now we '11 know 
How blow the winds around the camp of love ! 

Count Louis 
What is it, Rene de Vardes ? What is it, man ? 

D e Vard e s 

The King hath left the Tuileries ! The mob 
Forced the chateau and put his life in danger. 
The Swiss are murdered, cut down to a man ! 
The Grenadiers joined with the Marseillaise ! 
De Maille writes — the courier 's just arrived — 
All is distraction, danger, and despair! 

Sister Fidelis 
Alas ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

O Ciel ! 

The Abbe 

The soldiers in revolt. 

De L' Orient 

The Swiss all murdered — the stanch Swiss ! 

Sister Simplicia 

Alas! 



OF REASON 85 

Count Louis 
The King hath left the Tuileries ! 

D e Vard e s 

To-night 
I ride to Paris. 

Y v ETTE 

O God! 

The Abbe 
To Paris ! 
As well say that you ride to death, De Vardes ! 

Count Louis 
Ah, were I young again, I 'd ride with you ! 

Sister Fidelis 
Alas, they say it is a fearful place ! 

Sister Simplicia 
It is so safe in Nantes ! 

D e Va rd e s 
Ah, my Sister, 
Because it is so safe in Nantes I go ! 
Once I did love this people; once I thought 
Beyond this Revolution lay the morn, 
The dewy morn of a most noble day ! 
It may be so ; I know not ; but I am 
A soldier of the King. Needs must I go, 
My bugles call ; I 'm breaking camp. Farewell ! 

Sister Fidelis 

You will return. 



86 THE GODDESS 

D e Vard e s 
If I m in life I will ! 

Y VETTE 

O Our Lady ! O Our Lady ! 

[The noise in the street increases. The tocsin rings. 
The sky begins to darken before an approaching 
storm. 

Co unt Louis 

Ring on ! 
Ye bells ! ring on to the deaf sky ! O France, 
Of old thou wast a pleasant land and free, 
In palace and in field a courteous place ! 
Now thou art desolate ! Come, Austria, come ! 
Come, D'Artois, come, Brunswick, and come, Provence ! 
Rend the tricolour from the breast of France 
And plant the fleur-de-lis where stood the Jacobins ! 

Voices {from the street) 
Quoi ! ces cohortes etr anger es 
Feraient la loi dans nos foyers ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
Hast said farewell to the Marquise ? 

De Vard e s 

Not yet, 

As far as Vannes I ride beside her coach. 

Yvette 
Oh! — 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
Soon or late, she '11 draw you back to Nantes ! 
Now will she not? 



OF REASON 87 

De Vardes {smiling) 
Perhaps. 

Yvette 

Jesu Maria ! 

Sister Fidelis 
Monsieur, if you must go, oh, rest you sure 
Jealously will we guard and spotless keep 
The soul you stooped and drew from the foul mire ! — 
Yvette, come make your reverence to your lord ! 

Yv ETTE 
I kiss your hand, monseigneur! 

Th e Abbe 

There will be 
A storm to-night ! 

Count Louis 
Come, come, Rene de Vardes ! 
I 'd see the courier who brought this news ! 

De Vard e s 

I '11 follow you, Monsieur le Comte! 

[Exeunt Count Louis, his daughter •, De L'Orient, 
The Abbe, and the Sisters. 

Yvette 
Wilt thou go ? 

De Vardes 
I must. 

Yvette 

Why must thou go ? 



88 THE GODDESS 

To-day the kingdom fell ! Oh, in the dust 

Of old things let it rest for evermore ! 

Take up the Revolution ! [Lightning. 

Oh, see ! 
The flaming sword before the gates of Eden ! 
Thou 'rt safe within the garden ! Go not forth. 
Go not to Paris ! Stay in Nantes, ah, stay ! 
Wear the tricolour — [Thunder. 

Hark ! It is the voice, 
The menacing voice of the Republic ! 
It threatens thee, it threatens all who pass 
That flaming sword, to lift the thing that was 
And is not any more ! Oh, let it lie ! — 
Thou 'It not to Paris ? 

De Vard e s 

To-night, Citoyenne ! 
Ah, thou art skilful at betraying ! 

Y v ETTE 

Quoi! 

Enter Sister Benedicta. 

Sister Benedicta 
Monsieur le Baron de Morbec, the page 
Of Madame la Marquise de Blancheforet 
Attends — 

Yvett E 

Name of a name ! 

The Abbe {appearing in the door behind Sister 
Benedicta) 

De Vardes, De Vardes ! 
You gather the furze while the red rose waits ! 



OF REASON 89 

De Va rd e s 
At once, my Sister ! 

(To Yvette.) Ah, not in anger, 
Must thou and I part for this little while ! 
If I 'm in life I will return, be sure, 
To Nantes and all this garden loveliness, 
Those fruit trees and this fountain ! — Fare thee well. 
The nuns will care for thee ; I Ve ordered all. 
Too fierce of aspect is the world without! 
Here is fair peace, security, and calm ; 
Here thou art fenced from storm and violence. 
Abide thou here until I come again ! 

[Lightning. 
Yvette 
The flaming sword ! 

D e Vard e s 
Hearest thou not, Yvette, 
How sings the lark in Paimpont Wood to-day ? 

Yvette 
I hear the dirge of the salt sea ! 

D e Va rd e s 

And there, 
Seest thou not through yonder trees the stone, 
The Druid Stone where thou didst lie in sleep ? 

Yvette 
I see a broken fan ! 

D e Vard e s 
Abide thou here 



9 o THE GODDESS 

And dream of Paimpont Wood until I come. 
I too will dream, I too will dream, Yvette ! 

Y VETTE 

Is not Clarice a lovely name? 

De Vardes 

Why, yes, 
A very lovely name. — Farewell, farewell ! 
I '11 see thy face, be sure, this very night, 
Upon the road before me as I ride. 

Yvette 

Oh, fare you well beneath the silver moon 

As slow you ride beside a lady's coach, 

Discoursing of the dazzling, snowy heights ! 

I kiss your hand, monseigneur ! Fare you well ! 

[The Abbe's voice is heard from the doorway, 

♦ 

The Ab b e 

De Vardes! De Vardes ! 

De Vard e s 
I come ! 

The Ab b e 

The rose awaits ! — 
Yvette 



It is too much ! 



De Varde s 
Farewell, thou spirit of Paimpont ! 

[Distant music. 



OF REASON 91 

Yv ETTE 

Ah, ah ! 't is worth all else — the Marseillaise ! 

De Vard es 
My Duchess Jeanne — 

Yvette 

She is dead : cold and dead ! 
Aux armesy Citoyens ! 
Formez vos bataillons ! 

D e Vard e s 

Perverse and strange ! 

Yvette 

I '11 to my beads. Adieu ! 
Over Ts y the sunken town. 
When thou sailest look not down y 
Mariner ', mariner I 

D e Vard e s 

What wine hast thou drunken ? 

Yvette 

An old wine — 
For there dwells a fairy there 
Will drag thee down by the long hair> 
Mariner ", mariner I 

D e Va rd e s 
Oh, thou art too wilful ! 

The Abbe 

De Vardes ! De Vardes ! 



92 THE GODDESS 

Y v e T T E (to the fish in the fountain) 
Gold fish, gold fish, how are the fish of Quiberon ? 

De Vardes 
Thou sullen witch, adieu ! [Exit De Vardes. 

Y v ette 

Monseigneur ! ah ! 
He 's gone ! He 's gone to meet the fairy queen ! 
He 's for the roses and the dazzling peaks ! 
The seaweed and the furze he 's left behind ! 
He 's left the storm, he *s left the storm and me ! 

[The convent hell rings. 
Toll, toll ! as though thou 'd toll my soul away ! 
Thou canst not toll him back ! Oh, woe is me ! 

[The nuns sing in the chapel. 

Voice s 
O salutaris Hostia I 
ghiae coeli pandis ostium : 
Bella premunt hostilia, 
Da robur fer auxilium I 

[Above the wall where it is shadowed by a fruit 
tree, appear the head and shoulders of Lalain. He 
draws himself up to the coping, watches Yvette 
for a moment, then swings himself down to the gar- 
den. He has a rose in his hand. 

Yvette 
Where is the sunshine gone ? Where is the gold ? 
It was a lovely day ! 'Tis cold and dead; 
No light, no warmth, no cheer ! — Oh, presently 
Those two will take the summer road to Vannes! 



OF REASON 93 

Ha ! does he think that I will meekly stay 

Within this convent close, will kneel and pray, 

Day in, day out, for all true lovers' weal ? 

What is there now to do ? — O Jealousy ! 

I dream of Paimpont Wood in June ! I '11 dream 

Of sunlit peaks, of roses named Clarice; 

I '11 dream of furze that's set about with thorns 

And clings unto the common earth which bore it ! 

[A roll of thunder. 
On, on ! It suits my mood, the crashing sound ! — 
Jehan the fisherman ! rise from the sea, 
Lay thy cold hand upon the heart of her 
Who 's not thy child, and teach her how to hate ! 
Yvonne who parted from the earth one night, 
Come through the storm that darkens overhead 
And teach thy daughter how to hate ! Thou too, 
Thou other one, thou seigneur high and grand 
Whose signet burns- upon my aching throat, 
Whose nature stirs within me suddenly, 
Arise from hell and teach me how to hate ! [Thunder. 

Voices from the Chapel 
Tantum ergo sacramentum 
Veneremur cernui — 

Y v E T T E 

O Our Lady ! O Our Lady ! O Our Lady ! 

[Lalain throws the rose. It falls beside Yvette. 

Oh! — 

\_She raises the flower to her lips. Lalain comes 
forward. 

Thou ! I thought it was — I thought it was. 



94 THE GODDESS 

Go ! No rose of thine would I have kissed, 
Remond Lalain ! 

\JVith a wild petulance she throws down the flower 
and treads upon it, 

Lalain 
Now for that deed of thine 
I will not spare him when the day is mine ! 

Yvette 
Of whom speakest thou ? 

Lalain 
The Citoyen Vardes. 

Yvette 
Let him be ! 

Lalain 
The Citoyenne Blancheforet. 

Yvette 
Again ! 

Lalain 
'T is said the two will shortly wed — 
A fitting match ! — She 's fair and nobly born. 
Thou mightst have seen, thou mightst have seen last night, 
Walking by moonlight beside the Loire, 
A lady the fairest and a great lord ! 

Yvette 
Say'st thou ? 

Lalain 
Beneath the trees, beside the flood, 
Toying and whispering, the sword and fan ! 



OF REASON 95 

YVETTE 

Out and alas ! Begone, thou torturer ! 

Lalain 
Oh, those old days when by the shore we walked 
While sank the sun beneath the emerald waves, 
And wild sea birds flashed all their silver wings, 
And long we talked of France and liberty ! 
How thou art tamed, Yvette, Yvette Charruel ! 
Thou carest not now for France and liberty ! 

Yvette 
It is not true ! Thou knowest that I care ! 

Lalain 
This sultry night I speak to patriot hearts 
Of War, Dumouriez, Brunswick, Capet ! 
All Nantes will throng to hear me where I stand, 
In the Church of Saint Jean, who 's now become, 
From crypt to spire, one mighty Jacobin ! 
High in the gilt tribune beneath the roof, 
The starry roof where the archangels live ! 
Faces me Michael with his flaming sword, 
And Raphael watches me with widened eyes, 
And Gabriel frowns between his splendid wings 
Because there 's no more incense ! When I speak, 
The painted walls all vanish like a mist ! 
On distant plains the drum begins to beat, 
The great dome lifts — above the angel heads 
I see the stars — 

Yvette 
There are no stars to-night ! 



96 THE GODDESS 

L ALAIN 

There are ! There are ! Eternally they shine 
Beyond this din, beyond these sulphurous clouds ! 
And there 's a stairway, red and white and blue, 
By which to climb to some most famous star 
Of glory and of love ! Yvette ! Yvette ! 
Climb thou with me unto that golden star ! 

Yvette 
Remond Lalain — 

Lalain 
Come thou with me, Yvette ! 
Come thou with me from out this sluggish place ! 
Come thou with me into the furious storm ! 
What dost thou here, thou spirit of the wind, 
Restless, with deep eyes and with parted lips? 
Thou knowest thou hast naught to do with holy things. 
Tear off that white headdress ! Red is thy colour ! 

Yv ETTE 
Ay, red is my colour ! 

L A L A I N 

Last night, the while 
I spake of War and all the place was still, 
A sudden vision blazed above the lights — 
I saw thee dance the Carmagnole ! 

Yv ETTE 

Now, now ! 
What whispers he to her upon the road ? 

Lalain 
To-night — ah, should I raise my eyes to-night 



OF REASON 97 

And see thee smiling there, Yvette, Yvette ! 

Beside thy sisters in the galleries ! 

Upon thy twilight hair the bonnet-rouge, 

At thy small waist a pistol and a dirk — 

Only the Revolution in thy soul 

And in thy heart my name, my name, Yvette ! [Thunder. 

It thunders now, but 'twill be clear to-night. 

The moon will shine, the roads will all be white. 

Yvette 
The roads will all be white, the moon will shine, 
The poplars quiver and the eglantine, 
The broom and honeysuckle will be sweet, 
Upon the road to Vannes — 

[Lightning and thunder. Lalain walks to the door 
in the wall, tries it, then with a stone from the 
ground beats back the rusty bolt. 

Lalain 

An easy door ! 

Yv ETTE 
The moon will shine — 

Lalain 

I '11 go this way, ma foi ! 
Not by the wall ! 

Yvette 
The silver poplars sway ! 

Lalain 
Rene de Vardes, once I did call thee friend 
And took a deal of pride in that possession ! 
How runs the world away ! *T was long ago ! 



98 THE GODDESS 

Y V ETT E 

Ah, ah, that fearful dream I had last night ! 

And while I dreamed they walked beside the Loire ! 

La LAI N 
This night he rides away. Didst know ? 

Y v ETT E 

I knew ! 

L AL AI N 

He's said farewell to thee, but not to her ! 

YVETTE 

Wilt thou begone ! 

Lalain 
Ay, through this door, Yvette ! 
'Tis easy, as thou seest. And ah, to-night — 
The storm o'er past and shining bright the moon 
And the cold nuns all telling o'er their beads, 
How simple 't were — O priceless liberty ! 
Thou wouldst not be the only one, I trow, 
Who may not walk beside the silver Loire ! 

Yvette 
Name of a name ! 

L ALAI N 

Adieu, adieu ! To-night 
I '11 see thee sitting in the galleries — [Exit Lalain. 

Yvette 

Ah, how the thunder shakes the air ! 

[She moves to the door in the wall and replaces the 
bolt, then returns to the fountain. 



OF REASON 



99 



'Tis so ! 
He is her lover ! Oh, he loves her true ! — 
What will they say and whisper all the night 
Through light and shadow on the road to Vannes ? 
Despair ! — But I '11 not stay within these walls ! 

[Knocking at the door in the wall. Yvette crosses 
the stage to the door. 

Who is there ? 

Seraphine {within) 

Yvette! Yvette! 

Yvette 

Seraphine ! 

Seraphine (within) 

And Nanon too ! 

Yvette 

The deputy's sister ! 

Nanon 
Let us in ! 

Yvette 
I dare not. 

Seraphine 

What! 

Yv ETTE 

Wait : I dare ! 
[She draws the bolts. The door opens. Enter Sera- 
phine and Nanon. The former is dressed in com- 
plete carmagnole : short skirt, rolled-up sleeves, sash 
of tricolour, and a bonnet-rouge. Pistols at her belt. 



ioo THE GODDESS 

Nanon is more soberly attired but wears the bon- 
net-rouge. The door closes behind them. 

Seraphine ! 

S ERAPH INE 

Cherie ! 

Y V ETTE 

Nanon ! 

Nanon 

Dear Yvette ! 

Y v ETT E 
How gay you are ! What of the Revolution ? 

S E RAPHINE 

It goes. 

Nanon 
It goes well. 

Seraphine 

We have a new song ! 
Faith ! 'T is a greater song than Ca Ira ! 

Yvette (sings) 
Aux amies, Citoyens ! 
Formez vos bataillons I 



S ERAPH INE 



That 's it ! 



Nanon (looking about her) 
So very triste it is in here ! 

Seraphine 
So gay outside ! All Nantes is dressed in red ! 
There 's a procession, and then to-night 



OF REASON 101 

We sit in the galleries to hear Lalain ! [Distant music. 
Hark to the fife ! Formez vos bataillons ! — 
And your feet keep not time to the music ! 

Y v ETTE 
But my heart, Seraphine, my heart keeps time. 

Seraphine 
Ho ! Your heart is in barracks, says Celeste. 

Y V ETTE 

Celeste ! 

Nanon 
And Angelique. 

Yv ETTE 

Angelique ! 

Seraphine 

Faith ! 

Angelique is in feather now you 're gone ! 
Cries Vive la Republique ! here in Nantes. 
Rides on the cannon and handles a pike ; 
Thinks she 's in Paris and plays Theroigne, 
And high from the galleries applauds Lalain ! 

Nanon 
He thinks not of her; he thinks of Yvette ! 

Yv ETTE 
I care not of whom he thinks ! 

Seraphine 

On a fete day, 



102 THE GODDESS 

In a car triumphal see her appear ! 

Dressed like a goddess just down from the skies, 

All crowned with green oak leaves, borne shoulder high — 

Y v ETTE 
Angelique ! 

Seraphine (nodding) 
Ah, you see you are not there ! 
But between you and me, red does not become her ! 

Y v ETTE 
I should think not! — little blonde! 

S E RAPHINE 

Ah, but red 
Becomes you ! 

Yv ETTE 

Yes! 

Seraphine 
Monseigneur 's gone from Nantes. 
Yes, faith! I saw him ride away — 

YVETTE 

He 's gone ! 
Rememb'rest thou that lady fair and proud, 
Madame la Marquise de Blancheforet ? 

Seraphine 

Ho! 

(To Nanon.) Rememb'rest thou the Citoyenne Blanche- 
foret ? 



OF REASON 103 

Nano n 
The proud piece ! We are mire beneath her feet ! 
Last eve her coach threw mud upon my gown ! 
Let her beware ! One day she '11 walk afoot. 
Let her beware ! And let him too beware 
Who rode last eve beside her golden coach ! 

Y v ETT E 
Ha, ha! ha, ha! 

[Music and voices in the street. Impatient knocking 
at the door in the wall. 

Voices 
Hola, Aristocrats ! 
Nanon ! Seraphine ! 

N ANON 

Our friends await us. 

Seraphine 
We have business with the smith upon the quai, 
Where by the old dovecot he fashions pikes ! 

Voic e s 
A lions, enfant s de la patrie ! 

Nanon 
Come, come away! We'll leave the nun alone 
To say her beads for black Aristocrats ! 
How triste to be for aye in prison here ! 

Y v e t T E (angrily) 
Prison ! I am no prisoner, I ! 

Nanon 
Then come with us into the merry streets ! 



104 THE GODDESS 

S E RAP H I N E 

'T will be a heavy storm — all are within. 
How easy 't were to slip away with us ! 

Yv ETTE 
No, no ! 

Voices 
Citoyennes ! Citoyennes ! 



Ma'm'selle ! 



N AN O N 
YVETTE 

Ma'm'selle ! 

Nanon 
Aristocrat ! 

Y V ETTE 

Aristocrat ! 

S E RAP H IN E 

Well — kept by an Aristocrat — 

Yv ETTE 

You lie. 

« 
Seraphine (angrily) 

Saint Yves ! I lie ! Do IPO Seigneur Dieu ! 
This is Yvette, the herd girl of Morbec ! 
This is Yvette, the daughter of Yvonne ! 
This is that same Yvette who swore one day 
That rather would she meet the blight of hell 
Than take one favour from a seigneur's hand ! 
Once you were hungry ! Go you hungry now ? 



OF REASON 105 

You went in rags. Where is your ragged gown ? 
Barefoot — what 's that about that throat of thine ? 
I swear it is a jewel ! — and we pine 
For bread, we women of the Revolution ! 

[Yvette unclasps the jewel from her neck and lets 
it fall. 
I lie, do I ? Diable ! Just prove I lie ! 
This night we make a little noise in Nantes 
Shall show Aristocrats who is in danger ! 
Lalain will speak and all the bells will ring, 
And Angelique will deck herself in red ! 
Steal through yon door, be of us evermore ! 
I lie, do I ? Then show me that I lie ! 

Y V E TTE 

In Nantes where do you lodge ? 

S ERAPHIN E 

With Angelique 
Under the Lanterne, Sign of the Hour Glass. 

Voice s 
Nanon ! Nanon ! You are missing the sights ! 

[Distant music. 
Oth e r Voice s 
A lions, enfant s de la patrie, 
Le jour de gloire est arrive ! 

Nanon 
Come, come away ! 

[Seraphine unbars the door in the wall. It swings 
open. 



106 GODDESS OF REASON 

S E RAPHIN E 

Faith ! One can see the Loire ! 
'T is fine to walk beside it 'neath the moon ! 

Y v ETTE 

Oh! — 

VOIC E S 

'Tremblez, tyrans ! et vous perfides y — 

Nanon 
Away ! Away ! 

Y v ETT E 
I '11 go — I '11 go with you, 
Ye fruit trees and thou fountain, fare ye well ! 

[Exeunt Yvette, Seraphine, Nanon. The door 
swings to. Lightning and thunder. Sister Fidelis 
appears in the convent door. 

Voices {dying away) 

Aux armes, Ci toy ens ! 

Formez vos bataillons ! 

C U R TAIN 





a cr iii 

A square in Nantes. On the left the deep porch of a church 
with pillars. 'To the right and in the background, a per- 
spective of streets with tally many -windowed houses. Op- 
posite the church a great plaster statue of Liberty. Over 
the church door is written in white lettering: " The Re- 
public One and Indivisible. Liberty : , Equality, Fraternity 
or Death. National Property." A distant view of the 
Loire. Men and women in holiday garb, wearing liberty 
caps and great tricoloured cockades, cross and recross the 
square. Life, movement, colour. Red the dominant note. 
It is the year 1794. 

Hoarse voices within. Hawkers of Revolutionary journals 
cross the square. 



L 



A H AWKE R 

E Journal des Jacobins! 



De la L ant erne! 



Another 

Le Discours 

Enter Gregoire. 



A Third 

L'Orateur du Peuple! 

A Fourth 
Le pere Duchesne! Le Pere Duchesne ! 



108 THE GODDESS 

Gregoire {stopping him) 

Here ! — \_He buys a paper. 
And what to-day says Pere Duchesne ? 

The Hawker 

He says 
That Paris envies Nantes her Carrier ! 

Gregoire 
Humph ! 

A Hawker 

La Bouche de Fer ! 

Anoth e r 

Les Actes des Apotres ! 



A Citizen 



I '11 buy the Actes. 



Anoth e r 

I '11 buy the Bouche de Fer. 

[Enter a man with a long brush and a pot of paste. 
He proceeds to cover the wooden base of the Statue 
of Liberty with placards. 

The Crowd 
The placards ! The placards ! 

A Breton Sailor 

I cannot read ! 

\_He catches by the arm a man in a long cloak, with 
a broad hat pulled low over his face. 

Prithee, Citizen, what says the placard ? 



OF REASON 109 

The Man in the Cloak 
It says Duport is dead ; Biron is dead ; 
Barnave is dead. 

The Crowd 

Ha, ha ! Biron ! Barnave ! 

A Man 
Through the little window they Ve looked at last ! 
A bas les Aristocrats ! Vive la Guillotine ! 

Another 
Ah, here in Nantes we drown them in the Loire ! 

The Crowd 
Vive Carrier I Vive Lambertye I Vive Lalain ! 

[The man with the brush affixes a second placard. 

The Breton 

And this, Citizen ? 

The Man in the Cloak 
D'Alleray is dead ; 
Bailly is dead ; Du Barry is dead. 

The Crowd 

Ha! 

A WOM AN 

Ho ! ho ! The courtesan, she '11 kiss no more! 

The Crowd 
She '11 kiss no more ! 

[The man with the brush affixes the third placard. 



no THE GODDESS 

The Breton 

And this one, Citizen ? 

The Man in the Cloak (reads) 

The Republic One and Indivisible. 

It is Decreed 

There is no God. To-day we worship Reason. 

[The crowd applauds. 
A Man 
In a red mantle ! 

Anoth e r 
That 's the Paris Reason ! 
Our Reason wears blue. 

A Third 

And oak leaves in her hair. 

The Breton 
Is Reason truly a woman ? 

The Man in the Cloak 
God knows ! 

A Man 
Ha ! he says God ! God is a word forbid ! 

The Man in the Cloak 
Then Reason knows. 

A Man 
That 's better. 

[Singing within. A band of dancers, men and wo- 
men, whirl into the square. 



OF REASON in 

The Crowd 

Carmagnole ! 

The Dancers 

Dansons la Carmagnole I 

Vive le son, vive le son ! 
Dansons la Carmagnole ! 

Vive le son du canon ! 

[The crowd breaks and joins the dancers. They take 
hands and with uncouth and extravagant gestures 
circle once or twice around the statue, then with a 
long cry exeunt. 

A Woman 
The great procession forms upon the quai ! 

Anoth e r 
It winds and winds about and comes this way ! 

\_Exeunt men and women. Gregoire and the man 
in the cloak remain. 

Gregoire 
The priests are gone. It is Reason's fete day. 

The Man in the Cloak 
Reason, being a woman, will have her way. 

Gregoire 
Still, Monsieur l'Abbe — 

The Abbe 

I am known ! 



ii2 THE GODDESS 

G R E GO I RE 

To serve 
Monsieur, I had the honour at Morbec. 

The Abbe 
Monsieur le Baron's seneschal, I think. 

Gregoire 
The same, — but I am gaoler now in Nantes. 

The Abbe 
That night in June your musket would not fire! 
Diable! I 've played and lost ! Well, fellow? 

Gregoire 

Hein? 
The Abbe 

The wind blows cold in Nantes, and so I wear 
This cloak ! So long I Ve looked on fires of hell 
I needs must have a hat to shade my eyes ! — 
But now I '11 cock it in the face of all — 
Cold, wind, darkness, devils, and Republic ! 

Gregoire 
I think the citizen has lost his head. 

The Abbe 
Ay, and my heart as well. Hola ! what's that ? 

[A noise without. Clash of steel and excited voices. 

Enter De Vardes and Fauquemont de Buc pursued by 
seven or eight red-capped men armed with pikes. De 
Vardes and De Buc use their swords. 

Th e Red Caps 
Aristocrats ! Aristocrats ! 



OF REASON 113 

De Vardes (thrusting) 
Take that, 
Republican ! 

D e B u c (thrusting) 
Out, canaille ! 

The Abbe 

Here 's wine ! 
Have at you, brow-bound galley slaves ! 

De Vardes (over his shoulder) 
Ha ! De Barbasan ! \Wounds his adversary. 

We 're at our last chateau ! 

The Abbe 

I Ve shut Voltaire ! Here goes the candle out ! 

\_He throws his long cloak over the head of one of 
the red caps and makes at another with his dagger. 

D e Vard e s 
The window splinters ! 

[He sends the pike flying from a red cap's hand. 
Take warning, sans-culottes ! 

The Abb e 
One, two, three ! 

De Buc 

My sword arm ! 

De Vard e s 

Fight with your left. 
I saw you do it at Nanci ! 



ii4 THE GODDESS 

Voices (within) 
Ah ! ca ira, ca ira, ca ira ! 
Les Aristocrats a la Lanterne ! 

D e Vard e s 
Richard, O mon Roi, 
Uunivers fabandonne ! 

\A howl from the mob. 

The Mob 

Aristocrats ! 

Gregoire (from the statue) 
Desperate ! 

[The red caps, De Vardes, The Abbe, and De Buc 
fight across the stage and exeunt. Gregoire fo Hows 
them. 

Voices (within) 
Ca ira! 

Enter women and children of the Revolution. 

A Woman 
Upon the church steps I will take my stand ! 

Another 
I have brought my knitting. 

A Third 
And I. 

A Fourth 

And I. 



OF REASON 115 

All (singing) 

We are the tricoteuses ! 

Dyed wool we knit while rumbles by the cart. 
Knit I knit I all knitting in the sun. 

We are the tricoteuses ! 
Red wool we knit while soul and body part. 
Knit ! knit ! the knitting now is done ! 

[They seat themselves upon the church steps. 

A Child 
Maman ! Maman ! how many carts will pass ? 

A Woman 

None, sweeting, none ! It is a holiday. 

Enter Celeste, Angelique, and Nanon. 

Nanon 
It was the very night of the great storm 
From those dull convent walls she ran away ! 

Celeste 
Two years agone — 

Angelique 

Would she had stayed ! 

Nanon 

Ah, then, 
You had been Goddess, Angelique ! 

Angelique 

The witch ! 
With her dark skin and with her purple flower ! 
Let her beware ! 1 know a thing or two ! 



n6 THE GODDESS 

Celeste 
/ know who comes from Paris back to Nantes ! 
This morning on the quai I saw him ! 

N a n o N (eagerly) 

Is't 
That ci-devant, that black Aristocrat, 

De Vardes ? 

Celeste 

The man your brother loves ? The same. 

Nanon 
I spit upon his name ! 

Celeste 
Denounced ! 

Nanon 

The set of sun 
Will see him so, or my name 's not Nanon ! 

Celeste 
The Loire — the Loire will close above his head ! 

Enter Seraphine. 

S E RAP H IN E 

Whose head ? 

Nanon 

The Citizen Vardes. 

S E RAPHINE 

Monseigneur ! 
He's in the prison of La Force at Paris ! — 
One truly told me so — He 's not in Nantes. 



OF REASON n 7 

N ANON 

And if he were — 

Seraphine (stammering) 
Why — why — 

Nanon 

And if he were, 
You would not give him up ! I know you well ! 
I know you, Seraphine ! 

S E RAP HINE 

And if you do, 
You know no ill of me, Citoyenne ! 

Celeste 

Yvette 
Would not give him up either. 

Angelique 

No, i' faith ! 
I '11 take my oath on that ! 

Seraphine 

Your oath, lint-locks ! 
It 's worth a deal, your oath ! Tour mind I know ! 
You would be Goddess, you and not Yvette ! 

Angelique 
Let her beware ! 

S E RAP HINE 

Yvette ! She 's coming now ! 
Bright as the star that's highest in the night ! 
And all the men have turned astronomers ! 
Faith! 't is easy work to worship Reason, 
When Reason is a woman, and that fair ! 



n8 THE GODDESS 

Ange lique 
I 've seen her gather seaweed on the shore ! 

S E RAPHIN E 

And now she gathers hearts in her two hands. 

Angelique 
Oh! oh! 

Nano n 

Would that my brother hated her! 
Disdainful prude ! 

Celeste 

Oh, love may turn to hate. 
She 's Goddess now, but wait, but wait, but wait ! 

Nan o n 
I join my brother at the Olive Tree. 
Come, Angelique, Celeste ! 

\_Exeunt Nanon, Angelique, Celeste. 

S E RAPHINE 

Were 't not too late, 
I 'd warn monseigneur just for old time's sake ! 
When all is said and done, old times are best ; 
He gave us back Lisette, he fed us all — 
Eh ! 't were a pity. What now ? Who 's this ? 

Enter hurriedly The Marquise. She looks over her shoulder 
as if fearing pursuit, then, drawing her cloak and hood 
closely about her, attempts to cross the square unobserved. 
Enter a rabble of men and women. 

The Mob 

Ah ! ca ira y ca ira, ca ira ! 
Les Aristocrats a la Lanterne. 



OF REASON 119 

Ah ! ca ira, ca ira, ca ira ! 
Les Aristocrats on les pendra ! 

A Tricoteuse 

She hides 

Her face. 

Another 

She draws her cloak about her ! 

The First 

Ho! 

Her hand is white and there *s a jewel on 't ! 

A Man {accosting The Marquise) 

Citoyenne ! 

The Marquis e 

Citoyen — 

Th e Man 
Citoyenne, come ! 
Join our ronde patriotique, our carillon ! 

The Marqui s e 
Sainte Genevieve ! 

Th e Man 
What? 

A Woman {her hand upon The Marquise) 

Where 's your cockade ? 

Another Woman 
Show ! 

The Marquis e 

Be grace, Citoyennes ! 



120 THE GODDESS 

Third Woman 

The cloak ! The cloak ! 
[They tear from The Marquise her hood and cloak. 

A Child 
Oh, the pretty lady ! 

The Marquise 
I '11 give you gold ! 
There, there ! — My rings, my brooch — take all ! 
Ah ! let me peaceably depart — 

The Mob 

Ha! ha! 

Aristocrat ! 

A WOM AN 

It is the emigree 
Clarice-Marie Miramand Blancheforet ! 
Are not her gold locks known in Brittany ? 

Another 
She fled to England. 

A Third 

She returned. 

The Marquise 

O death ! 
{To a woman.) Citoyenne, your cockade! I '11 wear it gladly, 
Ay, o'er my heart I '11 pin it — 

[She takes the cockade from the woman and with 
trembling fingers fins it to her gown. 

Th e Woman 

Red cap as well — 



OF REASON 121 

Th e Marqui s e 
With pleasure, Citoyenne. 

[She places the bonnet-rouge upon her head. 

The Mob 
Ha, ha ! 

A Man 

Now cry 
Vive la Republique ! 

The Marquise 

Vive la Republique ! 

The Man 
Mort aux tyrans I 

The Marqui s e 

Mort aux tyrans ! 

The Man 

A bas 
Les Aristocrats ! [Silence. 

The Mob 
Ah— h— h ! 

The Man 

Vive la Guillotine! 

[Silence. 
A Woman 

Take that ! [She strikes at The Marquise. 

The Mob 

Down ! Down ! 

[The Marquise breaks through the ring of men and 
women and runs to Seraphine. 



122 THE GODDESS 

The Marqui s e 

I know your face ! 
You are a Morbec woman ! Save me ! Save ! 

S E RAPH IN E 

Saint Servan ! Saint Gildas ! Saint Meriadek ! — 
Ay, madame, you should have stayed in England ! 

Enter De Vardes, torn and bleeding. 

D e Vard e s 
De Buc taken and De Barbasan ! Dieu ! 
The day 's not old. I '11 see them ere its close. 
We '11 meet, I think, at Carrier's judgment bar, 
Then the dark river, — and then peace at last — 

The Marqui s e 
A moiy Monsieur le Baron de Morbec ! 

D e Vard e s 
La belle Marquise ! 

[He forces his way to the side a/'The Marquise. 

Seraphine {from the church porch) 
Saint Yves le Veridique ! 

The Mob 

Both! Both! 

A Tricoteuse 
To prison with them ! 

Another 

To the Loire! 



OF REASON 123 

Ho ! ho ! Les Noces Republic aines ! 

[The mob surges forward, but with his sword De 
Vardes keeps a clear space about him and The 
Marquise. They move slowly backward to the 
church steps, which they mount. 

De Vardes (to The Marquise) 

We '11 smile and die ! 

The Marquis e 
Together, yes ! 

The Mob 
Down ! Down ! Aristocrats ! 

[De Vardes sends a knife whirling from the hand of 
a red cap. 

D e Varde s 
Follow ! Follow ! 
{To The Marquise.) I have been long in prison. 

The Ma rqui s e 
In England I ! — And there I pined for France — 
This sunshine dazzles me — 

D e Vard e s 

Clarice-Marie ! 

[Trumpets within. 
Seraphine 

Hark ! Hark, Citoyens, to the trumpets blowing ! 

The Mob 
She comes ! Nantes' goddess comes ! 

{Faces appear at the windows of the tall houses. 



124 THE GODDESS 

A Tricoteuse 

The windows fill ! 
[_The rolling of drums. 

Another Tricoteuse 
The drums begin to roll ! 

A Man 
Citoyens, all ! 
We '11 see best by the statue there ! 

Another [pointing to De Vardes and The 
Marquise) 

But these ? — 
The First 
They 're safe ! Let them await our pleasure ! Peste ! 
We waited once on theirs ! 

A Third 

That 's true ! 

\jThe mob divides. Men and women cluster about 
the base of the statue or upon the doorsteps of the 
surrounding houses. Enter men with banners* 

The Mob 

Look ! Look ! 
The painted banners ! Vive la patrie ! 

Seraphine [to The Marquise) 

Hist! 
Hist, madame ! behind the pillar there ! 

[She points to the pillar of the church. 



OF REASON 125 

D e Vard e s 

Go! 

[The Marquise conceals herself behind the pillar, 
A crash of music. 

Enter Lalain and Nanon. 

LAL AIN 

No blood to-day ! I 'd have clean sleep to-night, 
Pure sleep and sweet, in which to dream of love ! — 
Hast seen her in her mantle blue ? 

Nanon 

Who stands 
So steadfast there with a drawn sword ? 

Lalain 

Diable ! 

[He makes as if to cross to the church steps, where 
De Vardes, sword in hand, stands with his back 
against a pillar. 'The crowd comes between. 

Nanon 
Patience, he '11 not escape ! 

Lalain (with affected indifference) 

It is as well, — 

To her he 's but a ci-devant, and he, 

O fool ! shall see in her the Revolution ! 

Then, then, when she has passed, I '11 deal with him ! 

[Singing within. 
A Voice 

With sandals on her feet, 
The Phrygian cap so red 
Upon her sunny head, 



126 THE GODDESS 

She comes, she 's coming sweet ! 
Reason, to whom we pay 
All homage on this day! 

The Crowd 

The singers ! The actors ! 

Enter actors and actresses of the 'Theatre of Nantes, dressed 
as for the stage, and carrying garlands of paper flowers. 

An Actor 

Way for Tartufe ! 
The Citizen Jourdain, Phedre, Celimene, 
Acaste, Armide, Aucassin, Nicolette ! 
Make way ! Make way ! 

The Singer 
Upon her lofty car 

She sits in solemn state I 

Of day the lovely mate, 
Of night the shining star! 

Reason, to whom we pay 

All homage on this day ! 

The Crowd 

Brava ! What now ? 

The Actor 

Voltaire, Rousseau, Franklin, Robespierre ! 

[Enter a band of students drawing a garlanded float. 
Upon the float the busts of Voltaire, Rousseau, Frank- 
lin, and Robespierre. 

Th e Crowd 

Vive Robespierre! 

[The Marseillaise. Enter Republican soldiers. 



OF REASON 127 

D e Vard e s 

Oh, for the red Hussars ! 

[Enter four men wearing tricolour scarfs and plumes, 
huge cockades , pistols and sabres. 

The Crowd 
The Commissioners ! 

D e Vard e s 

Hooded crows ! 

[There crosses the stage a float upon which is fixed a 
miniature guillotine. 

The Crowd 

Vive la Guillotine I 



Ha ! ha ! 



A Man 
Vive les noyades! 

D e Vard e s 

Cold 

Are thy baths, O Apollo ! 

[Enter red-bonneted men and women dragging a tum- 
bril in which are heaped spoils of the church, — 
broken images , crucifixes, candelabra, chalices, patens, 
etc. 

The Crowd 

Ha— h— h ! 

D e Vard e s 

Jesu ! [He crosses himself 

[Music. The great tricolour fag of the Republic is 
borne across the stage. 



128 THE GODDESS 

The Crowd 

Lapatrie! Vive la patrie! 

De Vardes 

France ! France ! 

\Stately music. Enter young men in Greek dress, 
bearing a gilded framework upon which is fixed a 
tall flambeau, wreathed with flowers. They ad- 
vance and place the structure before the church 
steps. 

A Peasant 
Brave ! But what is it ? 

Another 

The torch of Reason ! 
The Goddess lights it, — then we worship her ! 

A Third 
No, we worship Reason ! 

The Second 

'T is the same thing ! 

[Enter young girls clad in white, linked together 
with tricolour ribbons and carrying osier baskets 

from which they scatter flowers. They are followed 
by children swinging censers, then by a shouting 
throng drawing a triumphal car upon which sits the 
Goddess of Reason. She is clothed in a white tunic 
and a blue mantle; upon her loosened hair is a 
wreath of oak leaves and she has in her hand a 
light spear. 

The Crowd 
Reason ! Reason ! — Yvette ! Yvette ! 



OF REASON 129 

D e Vard e s 

Mon Dieu! 
[The car stops. Yvette rises. 

The Crowd 

Vive la deessel Vive Yvette I (Lalain comes forward.) 

Vive Lalain! 

Lalain 

People of Nantes ! Citoyens ! Patriots ! 

Old things are past. To-day we welcome new. 

Gone are the priests, gone is the crucifix ; 

Chalice and paten whelmed beneath the Loire ! 

Kings, princes, nobles, priests, all crumbled down ! 

Death on a pale horse hath ridden o'er them, 

The ravens and the sea mews pick their bones. 

Theirs are the yesterdays, the ci-devants ! 

The red to-day is ours, the purple morrow ! — 

Liberty, Equality, Fraternity ! 

We worship Thee, Triune and Indivisible ! — 

O Mother Nature, pure, beneficent, 

Redeemed from darkness of the centuries, 

Smile on thy children, come to worship thee ! 

And thou, supernal Reason, Crown of Man, 

Eyes of the blind, divine, ascending flame, 

Pearl without price, rose, light, music, warmth ! — 

O gushing spring where else were desert waste ! 

O flooding light, celestial melody ! 

O flower that blooms on either side the grave ! 

O steadfast star that burns the night away ! 

We worship thee ! 

[He takes the censer from a boy and swings it to and 

fro before the standing goddess. Clouds of incense 

arise. The trumpets sound. 



130 THE GODDESS 

The Crowd (with ecstasy) 

We worship thee, Yvette ! 
Yvette ! Yvette ! Reason ! Yvette Charruel ! 

Yvette 
O God ! I knew not *t was like this ! 

La LAI N 

Reason, descend ! 
Illume thy torch, among us mortals dwell. 
O sweetest Reason ! ne'er regret the skies ! 
Descend — 

\He gives his hand to Yvette. She descends from 
the car. 

A Man 

She is the fairest Reason ! 

Another 

Now 
She '11 light the torch ! 

\_A boy brings her lighted touchwood. L al ain fastens 
it to the point of her spear > and kneeling presents it 
to her. She advances to the church steps and raises 
the flaming lance in order to light the torch. She 
sees De Vardes. 'The spear falls to the earth. The 
flame goes out. 

Yvette 

O Our Lady ! 

The Crowd 
Light the torch ! Light the torch ! 

L ALAIN 

What witchcraft 's this ? 



OF REASON 131 

Y V E TT E 

None, none ! — Oh, see the heavens open ! 



[Murmurs of the crowd. 

Angelique 

Goddess ! 
Goddess ! 

Celeste 

She hears not! 

The Crowd 

Light the torch ! 

L A L A I N 

I see 
Hell gaping ! What 's that man to thee ? 
Death and damnation ! Dost still gaze at him P 
Then to the winds, Irresolution ! \_He turns to the crowd. 

See, 
Patriots, see ! The light of Reason dies ! 
Out went the sacred flame beneath the eyes, 
The basilisk eyes of an Aristocrat ! 

The Crowd 
Away with him to prison ! Death ! The Loire ! 
Death to the emigre ! 

[A rush toward the church steps. De Vardes 
throws himself on guard. Yvette come s between 
him and the mob. 



Yv ETT E 






Back 


1 






The 


Mob 








Ah- 


-h- 


-h! 



132 THE GODDESS 

L A L AI N 

Art mad ? 
Stand from between the lion and his prey ! 

D E V A R D E s (to the mob) 
Men of Nantes ! leave women to one side ! 
(To Yvette with a gesture toward the car.) Goddess of 

Reason ! Mount Olympus waits ! 
(To Lalain.) At last, Remond Lalain ! 

L AL AI N 

Rene de Vardes ! 
\A man strikes at De Vardes with a long pike. 
His sword arm falls, and the sword rattles to the 
ground. A shout of triumph from the mob. The 
Marquise's cry from the pillar is not heard. The 
mob moves forward. 

Yvette 
Back, back, I say ! You '11 do no murder here ! 
What ! One man against a score ! — All Bretons ! 

The Mob 
Death to the emigre ! 

De Vard e s 
Not emigre ! 
Good folk, I Ve been in prison in La Force. 
Released, I journeyed home to Brittany ! 

A Man 
Thou 'It journey farther yet, Aristocrat ! 

Ange lique 
Thy boat shall travel down the Loire ! 



OF REASON 

Y V E TT E 

Shall it ? 
Shall it, indeed, thou gold-locked leprous woman ! 
Thy bark shall be sucked down by black Ahes ! 
I see three Vannetois ! — big Rubik, Yann, 
And Rivarol who won the singer's prize ! 
A moi, Vannetois ! — Who is that standing there ? 
Huon ! Rememberest thou the fields at dawn ? 
Rememberest thou the dim green hazel copse ? 
Rememberest thou one Pardon of Sainte Anne ? 

A Peasant 
Yvette ! 

Y v ETTE 
The sun went down, the stars shone out ; 
We wandered round the wreckage of a ship ; 
Beneath a shell we found a golden coin. 
Rememberest thou, Herve the Cornouillaise ? 

A Breton Sailor 
Yvette ! 

Yv ETTE 

Baptiste ! Michael ! Monik ! Ronan ! 
How loudly rang the bells of Quiberon ! 
To beat of drum we danced beside the sea ! 

Young Men 
Ho, ho ! That day ! 

Yvette 
Eh, who spoke to us there, 
Of glory, of France, and of Liberty ? 
Citoyen Deputy Remond Lalain ! 



! 33 



i 3 4 THE GODDESS 

Red wine he gave to you, to me a flower ! 
Mon Dieu ! I was so proud — 

L AL AI N 

Yvette ! 

Y v e t t e (to an old woman) 

M argot ! 
'T was I who watched with thee one stormy night 
When all thy seven sons were out at sea ! 

Th e Old Wo man 
Ay, ay, and they came safely home to me ! 

Yvette (to a child) 
O little Jeanne, where is the doll I gave thee? 

The Child 
Here ! — *t is named 'Toinette ! 

A Woman (with the child) 

She has another 
Named Yvette ! 

Yvette (to a band of young women) 
Fifine, Laure, and Veronique ! 
The moon shone bright, there was no wind at all, 
Below the heights the violet shadows slept, 
All sweetly smelled the gorse and white buckwheat, 
And dewy was the grass beneath our feet, 
And wet with dew the poppies in our hair! 
There came a sound of singing from the sea, 
Our hands we linked, we sped around Tantad, 
Fair shone the moon — 



OF REASON 135 

A Young Girl 

Oh, Eves of Saint John ! 

A Breton 
Iou ! Iou ! An Tan ! An Tan ! An Tan ! 

S E RAP H I N E 

Saint Ronan ! Saint Primel ! 

The Crowd 

Yvette ! Yvette ! 
Yvette Charruel ! 

Yvette 
O/olk of Nantes ! 
There is a thing I want so badly, I ! 
Call it a fairing from the Fete of Reason, 
And give the trifle to the poor Yvette, 
The poor Yvette who 's done her best to please you ! 
Oh, I 've music made for you to dance by, 
And for you held on high the great tricolour ; 
And in the night-time sung to you of dawn ! 
And for you, too, I Ve plucked the lilies up, 
Fast locked a door and flung away the key, 
And left the ravished garden evermore ! — 
A priest would say my soul I had imperilled. 

The Crowd 

No, no ! No priests ! Reason ! Reason ! Yvette. 

Yvette 
This mantle blue, these oak leaves in my hair, 
These sandals and this spear, this tunic white, 
The wreathed car, the music and the song ! 



136 THE GODDESS 

All, all a mockery, unless, unless — 
There is a thing I want so badly, I ! 

A Co MMISSIONER 

It is thine ! 

The Crowd 

Thine ! Thine ! Yvette Charruel ! 

Y v ETTE 
Ah, I would play the goddess, that I would ! 
I 'd have my pardon like a Breton saint, 
And what I bound, it should be bound indeed ! 
And what I loosed, it should be loosed indeed ! 

A Commissioner 
Fast bind or freely loose, thy surety, I ! 

Another 
Command me, and the silver moon I '11 bring thee ! 

Yvette 
With what a sudden glory shines the sun ! 
It gilds the streets, it gilds the running Loire ! 
And from them both the blood-stains fade away ! 
Ah, let us rest from death in Nantes to-day, 
And think how falls the eve in Bethlehem ! — 
There is a little village that I know, 
A hungry village by a hungry sea, 
As worn and grey as any calvary ! 
The hungry shadows ate the sunshine up ; 
The children cried, the women wailed at morn ; 
The very Christ looked hungry on the Cross ; 
When lo ! a miracle ! for suddenly 



OF REASON 137 

The starving, haggard folk began to laugh, 
The tender green put forth, the flowers bloomed, 
Blue shone the sky, the lark sang overhead, 
And mild the face of Christ and heavenly kind ! 
The little village had its fill of bread, 
Yea, wine it drank, and cheerful breath it drew, 
And, by the well, of this strange plenty talked, 
Of tolls withdrawn, of perfect friendliness ! 

[She moves from before De Vardes. 
And then it blessed the man who gave it bread, 
Who had a heart to feel with wretchedness, 
And a strong arm to drive the hunger forth 
As Arthur drove the giants from the land ! 

men of Nantes ! you '11 keep your oath to me ! 
In Nantes to-day 'tis mine to loose or bind ! — 

1 loose this man — 

L ALAIN 

Out, witch ! 
(To De Vardes.) Think not, think not, 
Rene de Vardes, that she shall save thee thus ! — 
Mine, mine she is, she shall be, soul and all ! 

De Vardes 
Remond Lalain — 

L a L a 1 n (to the mob) 
It is an emigre ! 
A traitor and a black Aristocrat, 
The ci-devant De Vardes ! 

The Crowd 

De Vardes ! De Vardes ! 



138 THE GODDESS 

Y V ETTE 

Remond Lalain, stand from my path, I say ! 

(To the crowd.) Not emigre, but prisoner in La Force ! 

Not traitor ! That 's a wretch who doth betray ! 

Aristocrat? — Who chooseth his birth star? 

Crieth at Life's gate, " Of such an house I 'm heir ! " 

But in we drift from the great sea without; 

A current takes us — " Of my house are ye ! " 

So you, so I, so this citoyen here, 

Remond Lalain, who is Lalain by chance, 

And might have been Capet or Mirabeau ! 

And so this other, standing gravely there 

Alone, a man alone upon a rock, 

And the tide mounts ! — The current swept him there ! 

Another drift, and he had been Lalain, 

Orator and idol of the Jacobins ! — 

Names ! They are the mist through which the man 

Is scarce discerned, the sea-drift hides the pearl. 

Ghosts of the past the present spurns ! Dead leaves ! 

Masks for the pauper and the prince ! Mere names ! 

I would not have them rule my spirit thus ! — 

Aristocrat ! I know not, but I know 

The man 's been known to lift a peasant's load 

And gather seaweed with a fisher's child ! 

A Breton Sailor 
'T is true ! And in my boat he 's been with me, 
When Ahes and the storm made black the sea ! 

A Peasant 
He walked beside me in the field and told 
Name of the silver star above the fold ! 



OF REASON 139 

A Soldier 
I was a red Hussar ! He fought like Mars. 
Eh, my Colonel — 

A Woman 
We know, we Morbec folk! 
Vive Baron Rene ! 

S E RAP H IN E 

Eh, eh, monseigneur! 

Yv ETTE 
Nantes ! Nantes ! you '11 keep the oath you Ve made to me ! 
My fairing I shall have this holiday, 
And what I bind it shall be bound indeed, 
And what I loose is loosed to me for aye! 
I ask one gift — I shall not ask again ! 
This is my hour, no other hour I want. 
I ask one life — is 't mine, is' t mine, Citoyens ? 

The Crowd 
Yes, yes ! 'T is thine ! 

A COMMI S S ION E R 

Thine, Goddess ! 
(To De Vardes.) Citoyen, thou art free ! 

L AL AI N 

Diable ! 

Yv ETTE 

I 'm faint. — 

S E RAPH IN E 

Saint Iguinou ! What of the pillar there ? 



Ho THE GODDESS 

A COMMI S SION E R 

Make way for the Citoyen Vardes! 

The Crowd 

Make way ! 

Seraphine 
Eh, eh, monseigneur; thou hadst best begone! 

De Vardes (to the Commissioner) 
Citoyen, thanks ! but here I '11 watch awhile 
These pleasing rites, this worship new of Reason ! 

The Commissioner 
'T will do thee good, Aristocrat ! 

D e Vard e s 

No doubt, 
Citoyen ! 

L A L A I N 

Oh, depth of hell! 

Nanon 

Oh, patience ! 

L ALAIN 

Why takes he not his liberty ? He stays ! 
To feast his eyes upon her face he stays ! 
Diable ! He speaks to her — 

Nanon 

Patience ! Patience ! — 
What flutters there behind the pillar? 



OF REASON 141 

L ALAIN 

Where ? 

[She points. They move together to the base of the 
statue. 

De Vardes {to Yvette) 
I owe my life to thee, thou hapless child ! 
Ah, couldst thou make this throng depart the place ! 

Yvette 
Monseigneur — 

The Crowd 
Goddess of Reason ! light the torch ! 

Yv ETTE 

I 'm faint ! — The houses all are dancing there ! — 
Give me drink! 

A Man 
Here 's wine ! 

[He pours wine into a great gold cup. 

Yvette 

'T is in a chalice ! 



Drink ! 



The Crowd 

[Yvette drinks. 



Yvette 

Nom de Dieu ! 'T is right good wine, indeed ! 
Not now I '11 light the torch — 'T is out for good ! 
And while we linger here the sunlight goes ! 
Let *s to the quai, let 's to the quai and dance — 
And dance the Carmagnole ! 



142 THE GODDESS 

The Crowd 

The Carmagnole ! 
[Men and women take hands and begin to dance. 

Y v ETTE 
Away ! Down the long street, and to the quai ! 
Take hands ! Away ! Dansons la Carmagnole! 

[She snatches from a boy a tambourine and strikes it. 
Vive le son y vive le son, 
Vive le son du canon ! 

\fThe crowd disperses. De Vardes remains standing 
before the pillar behind which crouches The Mar- 
quise. Seraphine watches from the church steps ; 
Lalain and Nanon from the base of the Statue 
of Liberty. 

Monseigneur ! 

D e Va rd e s 
Ay. 

Y V E TT E 

Now, now while the lark sings, 
And while the fairy wood is green, begone ! 
Oh, 't is not safe in Nantes ! They gave thy life, 
But oh, they 're fierce and fickle ! Back they '11 come ! 
I Ve enemies in Nantes, and there 's Lalain, 
Remond Lalain who '11 work me woe at last ! 
Thou must begone, but list, ah, list to me ! 
I know a secret place where thou mayst bide, 
So safe ! so safe ! and I will bring thee food, 
White bread and wine, and find for thee a way 
Forth from the town — 

D e Vard e s 

Ah, I may trust thee, sure ! 



OF REASON 143 

Y VETTE 

I never knew thou wast in prison there ! 
So sad, so dark the prison life, they say ! 
My caged bird I freed the other day. 
There are so many prisoners in Nantes, 
I would not have it one ! — 

D e Varde s 

My life I owe — 

Y v ETTE 
The spring draws on; 't will soon be June again ! 

D e Vard e s 
Now for another life I make my suit — 

Y v E TT E 
In Paimpont Wood the trees are greening now, 
In sun and shade the purple violets blow ! 

De Vardes 
In those old convent days, ah, ages gone ! 
Beneath the fruit trees, by the fountain there, 
I 've seen thee nurse a little fluttering bird, 
Wounded and frightened, fallen from the blue, 
But yet God's bird, and with a life to save ! 
And thou didst stroke its plumage tenderly, 
And gently fostered it between thy hands 
Awhile, and up it soared into the blue ; 
A moment since and thou didst save my life. 
Lo now, there is another thing to do ! 
Before my own life, I Ve a life in charge, 



144 THE GODDESS 

And to thee now I turn, and plead for help. 
In this wild town thou rulest o'er the hour; 
Be now the goddess and the woman too, 
Pitiful, tender, generous, and true ! — 
Lo ! here a wounded bird — 

[He moves aside. The Marquise leaves the shadow 
of the pillar. 

Y v E TT E 

Death of my life ! 

The Marquise 

Oh, guard me, all ye saints ! 

D e Vard e s 

Yvette ! Yvette ! 
[Lalain comes forward from the statue. 

Lalain {to Yvette) 
Right of the Seigneur ! 

Yvette 
So ! Thou hast returned, 
Beneath the trees, along the moonlit road ! 
And in thine arms the rose and eglantine, 
And on thy lips the song of all the birds ! 
Back ! There is a furze field bars thy way ! 

The Marqui s e 
Mon Dieu ! 

Yvette 
Hast thou another fan to break? 
Ha ! shrinkest thou ? 



OF REASON 145 

The Marquis e 
Sainte Genevieve ! 

Y v E T T e [raising her voice) 

Nantes ! Nantes ! 
D e Vard e s 
By all the gods ! — 

Y v ETT E 
A moi ! A moi ! Nantes ! 

[An answering cry from within. 

D e Vard e s 
Herd girl of Morbec — 

Lalain 
Right of the Seigneur ! 

Yvette 
A moi ! Citoyens ! Patriots ! 

Reenter mob. 

D e Vard e s 

Courage, 
Clarice ! 

Th e Marquis e 

O all ye saints ! 

Yvette 

Citoyens ! 
This ci-devant, this black Aristocrat ! 
Oh ! all this while she was in hiding here ! 



146 THE GODDESS 

Beside the pillar there she kneeled and laughed. 

Do I not know her laughter, rippling sweet 

Or o'er a broken fan or broken heart, 

Or in green Morbec and a garden fair, 

Or on the moonlit road to ancient Vannes? — 

She, she the ci-devant, the emigree ! 

Who to false England with her jewels fled, — 

Rubies, emeralds, and long strings of pearls ! 

The while in barren fields her peasants starved! — 

I denounce the Citoyenne Blancheforet ! 

The Crowd 
Ah— h— h ! 

The M arqui s e 

O terror ! 

D e Vard e s 

Thy hand in mine, Clarice ! 

Yvette 
What of, what of the dark line of De Vardes ? 
What tales are told of Morbec's black chateau ? 
More wicked and more lost than sunken Ys ! 
Wolves were they all, the seigneurs of Morbec ! 
Henri, Philippe, Gil, Rene, Amaury — 
All, all were wolves who lurked, who sprang, who tore, 
No heart of lamb, but just the heart of man ! 
Heart of a man, heart of a woman too ! 
Morbec ! De Vardes ! No direr names in France ! 
Right hands of kings, priests, soldiers, cardinals, 
Courtiers and lovers of the fleur-de-lis ! 
Passionate, proud, a whirlwind and a flame ! 



OF REASON 147 

Morbec ! De Vardes ! 'Ware all who came between 
The whirlwind and its goal, the stubble and the flame ! 

De Vard es 
Thou lost soul ! 

Lalain 

* Thou lovely fiend ! 

Yvette 
De Vardes ! De Vardes ! The name comes on the blast 
Up from the gulf where lie the thrones of kings. 
Battle, oppression, tyranny and wrong — 
Miramand, Blancheforet ! on sea winds in they float 
From that dim palace where that lost Ahes 
Down to her emerald windows beckons man 
And spreads the bridal bed in sunken Ys ! 

Nanon 
Mon Dieu ! The bridal bed ! 

Yvette 

By all the wrongs 
That both their houses through the ages long 
Have wrought us ! By the blood that they have shed, 
The tears, the groans, the sweat, the servile knees, 
The bitter bread they gave us, and the cry 
From lonely graves of anguish and of wrath ! 
By all the hunger and the freezing cold ! 
By all the toil and all the hopelessness, 
The smitten cheek, the taunt, the burning heart ! 
By all the Rights of all the Lords of Wrong ! 
By Corvee and Gabelle and Gibier, 



148 THE GODDESS 

Quintaines y Milods, Ban d'Aout and BordeIage y 

Fouage, Leide, Corvee a misericorde, 

Banviriy Chansons, Baiser des Mariees! 

I do denounce these two Aristocrats: 

La Force's prisoner, and the emigree, 

La belle Marquise, the Hussar of the King, 

Citoyen Vardes, Citoyenne Blancheforet ! 

Lalain 
So! 

The Mob 
Away ! Away ! Prison ! Death ! The Loire ! 
Down, down, Aristocrats. 

[They close around De Vardes and The Mar- 
quise. 

S e raphin e 
Saint Maturin ! 
Saint Corentin ! Saint Jean ! 

The Marquise 

O bitter death ! 

D e Vard e s 

I am thy death, who thought to save thee so ! 

[The soldiers lay hands upon De Vardes and The 
Marquise and force them from the church steps 
and across the square. 

The Mob 

Away ! 

A COMMIS SIONER 

The nearest prison ! 



OF REASON 149 

A Man 

That 's the Church 
Of Saint Eustache ! 

A COMMIS SIONE R 

Away ! They shall be judged 
By Carrier ! 

The Mob 
Carrier ! — The Loire ! 

Yve TTE 

Ah! 
Ange lique 
Ha, ha ! Le Mariage Republic ain! 

YVETTE 

Quoi! 

Angelique 

Eh, they 're lovers, are they not ? 

Celeste 
The Loire shall marry them, the ci-devants ! 

Angelique 
Yvette has made the wedding, eh, Yvette ? 

The Mob 

Ha, ha ! Le Mariage Republic ain ! 

[Exeunt the mob, soldiers, De Vardes, and The 
Marquise, guarded, etc. 

Voices (within) 
Le Mariage Republicain ! Ha, ha ! 



150 GODDESS OF REASON 

YvE TTE 

What have I done ? 

Voices (dying away) 

Ha, ha ! ha, ha ! The Loire ! 



Yv 



ETTE 



The Loire ! — O God ! 

CURT JIN 





AC r IF 



The interior of a church in Nantes used as a prison. Great 
broken windows of stained glass, purple and crimson, 
through which streams the sunlight. Prisoners of both 
sexes and all ages and conditions of life move to and fro, 
or lean against the pillars which support the vaulted roof. 
Some rest or kneel upon the steps before the altar rail. 
Three children play beside a broken font. Against a door 
at the left of the great altar lounge several turnkeys 
dressed in blue woollen with red liberty caps. The Mar- 
quise sits beside a pillar. She talks with De Buc and 
Enguerrand La Foret. Near her are Count Louis 
and Mlle. de Chateau-Gui. De L'Orient stands 
upon a bench beneath a shattered window. De Vardes 
sits at a rude table writing. 

A butterfly enters at the broken window and flutters through 
the church. 

A Child 

^pHE butterfly ! The butterfly ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 



Oh, see 



Its painted wings ! 



A Child 
There ! There ! 



Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
It comes my way ! — I 've caught it ! — No ! 



152 THE GODDESS 

An Actress (dressed as a shepherdess) 

I! 

I have it fast, the pretty prisoner ! 

D e L'Orient 
It will not stay — 

Count Louis 
It soars into the roof! 
No ! down again on yon long ray of light ! — 
Give chase ! 

D e L'Orient 
Here ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
There ! 

The Actress 

Oh, oh ! It sails this way, 
The fairy boat — 

De L'Orient 

With freight of heart's desire ! 

The Actress 
I have it ! 

Count Louis 

No, I! 

\jthe butterfly lights upon his hand, 

'T is youth ! 

D e L'Orient 

'T is gone ! — 
\jThe butterfly brushes his shoulder. 
'T is joy ! 



OF REASON 153 

The Actress 

Fled I — Ah, ah ! — 'T is hope ! 

[The butterfly touches her outstretched arm, then 
rises again. 

No longer ! 

[The butterfly rests upon the fair hair a/The Mar- 
quise. 

The Marquise 
As I was saying, then I felt despair — 

[The butterfly rises, flutters in a shaft of sunshine, 
then passes out of the window. The prisoners watch 
its flight. 

A Child 

The butterfly has gone ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

Whither! 

D e L'Orient 

T is for 
The blue skies and the sunny fields ! 

The Actress 

The flowers 
We shall not gather any more ! 

D e L'Orient 

High hills, 
The water running in the sun and shade ! 

Mme. de Malestroit 
A garden old beside a winding stream — 
Oh, death in life ! 



154 THE GODDESS 

A Nun 
It was a soul set free. 
By now a thousand shining leagues it 's mounted ! 

\jThe door at the left of the altar opens. 

Enter Gregoire. 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
Here is Gregoire ! 

Gregoire 
Good-morrow, Citoyens ! 

Count Louis 
Good-morrow, Gaoler. 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

Ah, this place, Gregoire ! 
It is so triste ! Shall we forever stay 
Imprisoned in a church ? 

La Foret 

Oh, gayer far 
The Bastille or Vincennes ! 

The Actress 

These frowning saints ! 
The wind that whistles in ! 

Mme. de Malestroit 

The stones so cold ! 

Count Louis 
The Church will make us martyrs ere our time ! 



OF REASON 155 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
And did you buy, Gregoire, the cards for ombre ? 

The Actress- 
Masks for our play ? 

De L'Orient 
A violin ? 

The Actress 

Wax-lights ? 

De Buc 



The foils ? 



A Chi ld 
My ball, Gregoire? 



Gregoire 

I 've nothing bought — 
The judges sit to-day. Complain to them. 
The church is cold ! 'T is not so cold as Loire ! 
The prisons are too crowded ! Well, to-day 
We '11 weed them out ! 

De Buc 

So! 

Gregoire 

You are warned ! Prepare ! 
Make your farewells — the time is very short ! 

[Exit Gregoire. 
De Buc 

Strike camp! 



156 THE GODDESS 

De L'Orient 
The open road ! 

Count Louis 

Who goes ? 

La Foret 

Who stays ? 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
Our comedy ! — we cannot have it now ! 

The Actress 
Oh, we will rearrange the parts ! 

[De V ardes folds his letter and rises from the table. 

D e Vard e s 

We '11 play, 
Though all the world is sliding 'neath our feet ! 

De Buc 

The world 's a stage — 

The Nun 

De profundis clamavi 
Ad te Domine ! 

Enter the Abbe Jean de Barbasan,^/^, wounded, and with 
disordered dress. 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
Monsieur l'Abbe ! 

D e Vard e s 

Ah! 
De Barbasan, we feared for you ! 



OF REASON 157 

The Abbe 

Morbleu ! 
I am reprieved ! Lambertye proved my friend ! 
It seems that once I saved the villain's life ! — 
Pure accident ! — stumbled on him in a ditch, 
Played the Samaritan ! — so now I 'm spared, 
Come forth like Daniel from the lions' den, 
That Judgment Hall of theirs across the way ! 
Lions ! They are not lions, they are wolves, 
Hyenas, tigers, and baboons. Faugh ! 

De Buc 

So! 

They are hungry yet ? 

The Abbe 
Oh, they are portents ! 
And portents are the folk that fill that hall ! 
Not women they who sit aloft and knit; 
Not men, those scarecrow visages below; 
For robed judges, wolves at Lammas tide, 
And Nantes the winter forest for the pack! — 
But ah, the deer at bay, the little lambs ! — 
The earth gives 'neath their feet, they face the Loire ! 

[A confused sound from the square without the win- 
dow ; voices, menacing and execrating, a cry, then 
silence. 

D e Vard e s 

One has not gained the Loire ! 

The Abbe 

Ah, oftentimes, 
They fall before they reach the Judgment Hall ! 



158 THE GODDESS 

There in the street, before that fatal door — 
Both youth and age, fair women and brave men. 
Their blood cries to another judgment seat ! 
From yonder window you may see it all ! 

The Marquis e 
We will not look ! 

Count Louis 
Fie, fie, De Barbasan ! 
There is a time for everything ! Not now, 
Nor in this place is 't meet or debonair 
To speak of ravening wolves or stricken deer ! 
To work, my friend ! You find us much concerned * 
About this play of Moliere's ! We give 
Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme. 

The Marquis e 

You '11 play Jourdain ? 
Bejart had promised us, but then he went. 
He's not returned. 

The Abbe 
Nor will, I think. But, yes, 
I '11 take the part; I '11 speak in prose to you 
To whom I else would speak in poetry ! 

The Marquise (with a curtesy) 
Monsieur Jourdain, your prose is ravishing ! — 
I 'm Dorimene. 

De Buc 

And I Dorante ! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

Lucille. 



OF REASON 159 

Mme. de Malestroit 
Nicole ! 

The Actress 
I am, Monsieur Jourdain, your wife ! 

La Foret 
Your son-in-law the Turk ! 

De Vardes 

Behold, monsieur, 
Your fencing master ! 

D e L'Orient 
Your maitre de danse. 
Imagine, pray, you hear my violin : 
La, la — The minuet ! — La, Ja, la ! 

[He plays an imaginary violin. 'The prisoners hesi- 
tate^ laugh, then begin to step a minuet. The chil- 
dren and the gaolers watch them. De Vardes does 
not dance. He leans against a pillar to the left. 

Enter a turnkey, Celeste, Angelique, Nanon, and 
Seraphine. 

Seraphine {crossing herself) 
Eh ! Eh ! They dance ! — Well, what a thing it is 
To be a noble born ! 

Celeste {jealously) 
We dance as well ! 

Seraphine 
Ay, the Carmagnole ! 

Angelique 

*T is a swifter dance ! 



160 THE GODDESS 

Why came we here ? I never liked this church, 
They are too gay of heart, these ci-devants ! 
Let 's to the Judgment Hall, or to the Loire. 

Celeste 
Seraphine would come — 

S E RAPHIN E 

Patience, Citoyennes, 
No haste ! I Ve just a little word to speak 
Unto monseigneur there. 

Celeste 

Monseigneur ! 

Seraphine 

Oh, 
The Citoyen Vardes ! You know my tripping tongue. 

N A N o N (to the turnkey) ' 
Where is that ci-devant men once did call 
La belle Marquise ? 

The Turnkey 

'T is she who dances there, 
Fair-haired and dressed in violet. 

Nanon 

Awhile 
I '11 watch her dance. 

Celeste 
Their cheeks are pale. 



OF REASON 161 

Angelique 

They smile. 

I would not smile if I were they. 

[Nanon, Celeste, and Angelique watch the 
dancers, Seraphine approaches De Vardes. 

Seraphine (in a low voice) 

Monseigneur! 

D e Vard e s 
Seraphine Robin, I believe ? 

Seraphine 

Saint Yves ! 
Now just to think ! Monseigneur knows my name ! — 
Eh! Morbec was my home for many a year. 
When all is said and done, Home is just Home, 
Hut or chateau — and always the De Vardes 
Were lords of Morbec did they good or ill ! 
Most like 't was ill — but they were proper men ! 
And when they smiled we always said 't was day ; 
And old men say — but it was long ago — 
A baron lived was named Rene the Good ! 
Saint Gil ! Monseigneur gave us back Lisette. 
Saint Maudez ! 'T is a dangerous thing, but see ! 

[She takes from her bosom a silken purse. 
Eh, monseigneur, 't is yours ! Take it ! Quick, quick, 
Before Celeste — the baggage ! — turns her head ! 

[She thrusts the purse into his hand. 

D e Vardes 
From whom ? 



162 THE GODDESS 

S E RAPH IN E 

Look in it ! You will see. 'T is gold. 

D e Vardes 
Gold! 

Seraphine 

And something more. — Here is Angelique ! 

Angelique 
Aristocrat — That ring upon thy finger — 

Seraphine 
Out! 

D e Vard e s 

Not yet, Citoyenne ! 

Ange lique 

Then afterwards ! 
I '11 have it at the trenches or the Loire ! 

[She rejoins Celeste and Nanon. 'They watch the 
dancers. 

D e L'Orient 

Nicole — Lucille — Cleonte — 

Seraphine 

My errand 's done — 
Look in the purse, monseigneur, look at once ! 

D e L'Orient 
La, la, la, la ! 

D e Vard e s 
I have no need of gold. 



OF REASON 163 

S E RAPHINE 

Look, monseigneur ! 

De Vardes 
Again, from whom ? 

Seraphine 

A friend. 
D e Vard e s 

I have no friend in Nantes. Take back thy purse ! 

Seraphine 
It is not mine, the pretty, silken thing ! 
I swore that I would leave it, so I will ! 
And I was told to tell you, " Look within." 

[Nanon approaches, 

N ANON 

In Nantes one is Suspect when one is seen 
Whispering in shadows with Aristocrats ! 

S E raph 1 N E 
Nothing I said you might not hear, Nanon ! 
Come, come away ! 

(To De Vardes as she turns from him.) Monseigneur, have 
a care ! 

[Seraphine, Nanon, Celeste, and Angelique 
watch the dancers. A grating sound is heard with- 
out the door to the left of the altar. The turnkeys 
move aside, the door opens and discloses a passage 
lined with gaolers and soldiers. 

Enter Gregoire with three or four Patriots. They wear 
great boots, plumed hats, sashes of tricolour, sabres and 
pistols. 

D e L'Orient 

La, la, la, la, la ! 



1 64 THE GODDESS 

G RE GO I RE 

The list for the day. 

[The dance ceases. 
Celeste 

Now, now we '11 see the birds drop one by one ! 

Angelique 
It is what I love ! 

Gregoire {He descends the step from the choir) 
The list, Citoyens ! 
You whom I name pass out at yonder door. 
Across the square the judges sit — 

De Buc 

Just so ! 
Who leads ? 

Gregoire 

Citoyen, you ! 

De Buc 

Promotion, by God ! — 
Messieurs, mesdames, I have marching orders ! 
(To the Actress and Mlle. pe Chateau-Gui.) I cannot 

play Dorante ! Is 't not a shame ? 
De L'Orient there must take my part — Adieu ! 
(To The Marquise.) Ah, Dorimene, you '11 let me kiss 
your hand ? 

The M arqui s e 
Monsieur, monsieur — 

De Buc (to De Vardes) 
I 'm breaking camp. 



OF REASON 165 

D e Vard es 

Ma foi ! 

We '11 meet at the end of the march, my friend ! 

Meantime I '11 tell thee that Bouille once said, 

" Brave as a Gascon, or Fauquemont de Buc ! " 

De Buc 

Did he so ? Old Bouille ! [He salutes. 

My Colonel ! 

D e Vard e s 
Captain de Buc ! 

[De Buc mounts the step into the choir and passes 
out of the door, between the lines of soldiers. There 
is heard the voice of the mob in the square without. 

D E L' O RIENT 

Away with Melancholy ! 
The curtain 's up, the play begins ! Gregoire, 
My name is Thalia! Is 't on thy list ? 

Gregoire (his eyes upon the paper in his hand) 
No, Citoyen. 

D e L'Orient 

Another lifetime here ! 

Count Louis 
A golden louis to a paper franc, 
The next is Chateau-Gui ! — 



You are reserved. 



Gregoire 

No, Chateau-Gui, 



166 THE GODDESS 

Count Louis (taking snuff) 

Why, that is welcome news ! 
Eh, my daughter, we will not miss the play ! 

G RE GO I RE 

The Citoyen Charles Le Blanc. 

L e Blanc 

What damned star 
Flared and went out the night that I was born ? 

[Exit Le Blanc. 

Gregoire 

Herve Rauderendec, called the Breton ! 

Th e Breton 
Good people all, it has been pleasant here, 
But now the tide draws to the full — Adieu ! 
I must make sail ! [Exit the Breton. 

Gregoire 
The Citoyenne Gerard. 

The Actress 

I? 

Gregoire 
Delphine Gerard. 

The Actress 

Oh, I knew, I knew 
The butterfly that touched me was ill luck ! 
I named it Hope, — it fled, it fled away ! 

The Abbe 
We 're loth to let you go, Delphine Gerard. 



OF REASON 167 

Th e Actre ss 
There is no choice — I have my cue, you see ! — 
And after all the play 's a tragedy. [Exit the Actress. 

Celeste 
'T is better worth our while across the square ! 

Angelique 
'T is so ! Let 's to the Judgment Hall. 

Nanon 

Agreed. 
Come, Seraphine ! 

S E RAPHINE 

I '11 follow presently. 

Angelique 
Do not delay. We '11 keep a place for you ! 

[Exeunt Nanon, Celeste, and Angelique. 

Gregoire 
The Citoyenne Vaucourt. 

Mme. de Vaucourt 

Children, children ! 
Your father 's calling me from Paradise ! — 
Therese, Philippe, farewell, farewell, farewell ! 
Oh, clasp me close and kiss ! — Forget me not ! — 
Yes, yes, I '11 buy the bonbons and the doll ! 
I '11 not forget — 

Gregoire 
The boy goes with you. 



168 THE GODDESS 

Mme. de Vaucourt {wildly) 
With me ! He 's but a babe ! Not eight till June ! 

The Boy {clinging to her) 
To the toy-shop, mother ! 

Mme. de Vaucourt 

Oh, yes, child, yes ! 
To the toy-shop ! 

[They go out together. 

Gregoire 

Maria Innocenta Sombreuil ! 

[A young girl in the habit of a Carmelite novice 
leaves the shadow of a pillar, with raised face and 
hands crossed upon her breast mounts the step and 
passes out between the soldiers. 

Gaspard Le Borgne! 

L e Borgne 

An angel leads me on. 

[He follows the novice. 

Gregoire 

Enguerrand La Foret ! 

La Foret 

Ha, ha ! — ha, ha ! 
Ha, ha ! — 

[Hysterical and continued laughter. Gregoire and 
the turnkeys look stolidly on, but the prisoners are 
disturbed. 

Count Louis 
For shame, Enguerrand La Foret ! 
Before women ! — Die like a gentleman ! 



OF REASON 169 

La F 6 r e t (He leans against the balustrade of the choir) 

Ha, ha ! 

Count Louis 

Fie, fie ! You shame us all ! 

La Foret 

Ha, ha! 

I laugh because — ha, ha ! — 't is such a joke ! 

[He mounts the step still laughing, then suddenly 
recovers himself and turns with fury. 
Who calls me coward ? I laughed because I laughed ! 

[He wrests a musket from the nearest soldier and 
stabs him with the bayonet. 
Take that ! — There 's one at least will laugh no more ! 
[Oaths and confusion among the gaolers and soldiers. 
A sigh of satisfaction from the prisoners. La Foret 
is dragged out. Gregoire looks at his list, then at 
De Vardes. 'The latter advances. 

Gregoire [hurriedly to himself) 
To-morrow — not to-day! I '11 risk that much, — 
Just for the way he fought that Morbec night ! 
(Aloud.) Stand back, Citoy en Vardes! Your time 'snot yet. 

[A murmur of pleasure and congratulation from the 

prisoners. 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
We are so pleased, Monsieur le Baron ! 

Gregoire 
Citoyens Rochedagon and Pincornet ! 

[The men named go out. There is heard from the 
square without and from the passage a sound of 
acclamation. The door is flung open and the Actress 
enters. 



170 THE GODDESS 

The Actress 
They harmed me not ! " No, no ! " they said. " No, no ! 
Delphine Gerard must play for us in Nantes/' 
Oh, the people ! Oh, the dear good people ! 
Oh, blessed fortune ! 

D e Vard e s 
We are most happy ! 

The Abbe 
Delphine Gerard ! 

Count Louis 
Welcome, mademoiselle ! 
You see the play is still a comedy ! 

Gre GO I RE 

Marneil, Delille ! [Exeunt the men named. 

De L' Orient 

The leaves fall fast, 
The tree will soon be bare ! 

Gre goi re 

The Citoyenne 
Clarice-Marie Miramand Blancheforet. 

D e Vard e s 
Oh, wretch ! 

Th e Prisoners 
La belle Marquise ! 

Th e Marquis e 

It is my name ! — 
I had no thought I would be called to-day ! — 



OF REASON 171 

Unwarned ! That 's horrible ! Ah, good Gregoire ! 
A little while — 

Gregoire {stolidly) 
Citoyenne Blancheforet. 

Th e Marquis e 
Ah, villain ! 

De Vardes (to Gregoire) 

Five minutes ! 

[He slips into Gregoire's hand the -purse of gold. 
Gregoire hesitates a moment, then his hand closes 
upon the purse. He thrusts it into his bosom. 

Seraphine 

Saint Michel ! 

[De Vardes comes to The Marquise and they speak 
together. Gregoire turns to another group of pris- 
oners. 

Gregoire 

Montfaucon and Guistelles. 

Seraphine 

Saint Guenole ! 
He hath the purse ! The paper in it too ! 
He 's rock ; he, black Gregoire ! Alack the day! 
Saint Huon ! What 's to do ? — 

Gregoire 

Sorel and Mornay ! 

Seraphine 

Saint Yves le Veridique ! I will away ! 

[Exit Seraphine. 



172 THE GODDESS 

De Vardes (to The Marquise) 
Would I might die for thee ! 

The Marquis e 

*T is but a dream ! 

D e Vard e s 
Clarice ! Clarice ! 

The Marqui se 
A vision of the night ! 

De Varde s 
Clarice- Marie ! 

The Marqui se 

I will awake ! 

D e Vard e s 

My friend ! 

The Marquise 
Ah, only that ! 

De Vard e s 

La belle Marquise ! 

The Marqui s e 

No more ! 
D e Vard e s 
How long have we been friends ! And now — 

Th e Marqui se 

And now ! — 
D e Vard e s 

My friend, my friend ! 



OF REASON 173 

The Marqui s e 

Alas ! Alas, 't is true 
We are good friends — in life and death good friends ! 
'T is much — though there are lovers too in Nantes, 
And when one loves 't is not so hard to die ! 
Or so I Ve heard, monsieur. 

D e Vard e s 

O destiny ! 

The Marqui se 
The jasmine is my flower — a luckless bloom! 
Wear not the too-sweet jasmine flower, 
For then one loves, but is not loved again ! 

D e Vard e s 
No, no ! the rose — 

The Marquise 

The rose unloved ! Ay, ay ! 
Last night I dreamed of roses and of lights, 
Beside a water still they burned and bloomed — 
Lit candles and pale roses with gold hearts, 
Like those that bloomed within my garden once, 
When you rode by, when you rode by, my friend ! 

De Vard e s 
Alas! 

Th e Marquis e 
They 're dead, my garden roses, dead ! 
They '11 bloom no more, nor wilt thou ride that way ; 
Nor, Sieur de Morbec, dost thou love the rose. 
For once thou said'st to me upon a day 



174 THE GODDESS 

When I did find the Morbec roses fair, 

" I better love the heartsease at thy feet." 

The peasant flower ! Rememb'rest thou that day ? 

'T was Saint John's Eve — 

D e Vard es 

Would I remembered not ! 

The Marquise 

The heartsease — 

D e Vard e s 

The heartsease withered. 

[A roar from the square. De L' Orient turns from 

the window. 

D E I/O RI E NT 

Ah! 
Count Louis 
What do you see ? 

D E L'OrI E NT 

Too much! 

[A turnkey laughs. 

Th e Tu rnke y 

Carrier ! Lalain ! 
Oh, they judge quickly ! Vive la Republique ! 

The Marquise 
It was a summer day when first we met, 
And now we part within a prison here, 
And never shall we see each other more ! 

D e Vard e s 
Oh, briefer than the fairest summer day 



OF REASON 175 

The little hour before we meet again ! 
Soon, soon I '11 follow thee, and all of these ! 
The reaper hath his sickle in the corn. 
He is a madman, but the field is God's, 
And God will garner up the fallen ears, 
And in another life we two shall meet ! 

The Marquise 
And wilt thou love me then ? Ah, no ! Ah, no ! 

D e Vard e s 
Thou art a lady brave and fair — 

The Marquise 

Alas! 

Gregoire 

The Nun Benoite, an Ursuline ! 

[A nun rises from her knees, makes the sign of the 
cross, and passes out between the soldiers. 

The Marquise 

Ah me! 
The unknown land, just guessed at and no more, 
To which this loud wind sends my cockle boat ! — 
Where are my beads ? Lost, lost with all things else ! 
Jewels and gold and friends and lovers too ! — 
Ah, short my shrift with Gregoire glowering there. 
My hatred of Madame la Marechale, 
I 'm sorry for 't. The Captal de Montgis 
Once did me wrong. Well, well, I can forgive ! — 
Sieur de Morbec, where 's she that flung us down, 
Lifted her finger and behold us here ! 



176 THE GODDESS 

Her face is fair — ah, very fair her face. 
She was your mistress, yes ? 

D e Va rd e s 
No! 

The Marquise 

What then ? 
D e Vard e s 
Cold that I warmed, and hunger that I fed. 

The Marquise 
O strike her, Frost ! O Hunger, with her wed ! 

D e Vard e s 
Ah, curse her not ! She knew not what she did ! 

The Marquise 
Alas! Alas! 

Gregoire 

The Citoyenne L'Esparre ! 

The Marqui s e 
The women go — He '11 call my name ! Ah, look ! 
The purple saints within the windows there, 
See how they wave their palms and smile at me ! 
They wave their palms, they strike their golden harps, 
Their aureoles are brighter than the sun ! 

Gregoire 
The Citoyenne Blancheforet ! 

The Marquis e 

The clock has struck ! 



OF REASON 1 77 

D e Vard e s 
All angels guard thee ! 

The Marquise 

Fatal is my name 
And hated through long years in Brittany. 
Perhaps I shall not live to cross the square ! 

[The noise of the mob without. 
Oh, hear! 

D e Vard e s 

Take courage ! 

Th e Marqui s e 

From the window there, 
Wilt watch me on my way? 

D e Vard e s 

Ay! 

Gregoire 

Citoyenne ! 

The Marquis e 
Farewell ! Ah, not my hand, my friend ! 

De Vardes {He kisses her upon the brow) 

Farewell ! 
Farewell — 

[The Marquise turns to the remaining prisoners. 

The Marqui s e 
Messieurs, mesdames, 't is with regret 
I take my leave of this fair company ! 
My part of Dorimene — it must be played 



178 THE GODDESS 

By some more able, not more willing, one; 
For me — I'm bidden to a wider stage. 
Adieu ! Adieu ! Adieu ! 

The Prisoners 

La belle Marquise ! 

[Exit The Marquise. De Vardes crosses to the 
window, De L'Orient gives him place, and he 
stands upon the bench and watches the square with- 
out. 

Count Louis 

There are three names that most of all they hate : 
De Vardes and Chateau-Gui and Blancheforet ! 

Gregoire 

Pasquier, Harlebeque, and Damazan. 

[There is heard from the street without a confused 
sound of execration and triumph. 'The now small 
company of prisoners exchange glances. 

D e Vardes {at the window) 
Grand Dieu ! 

De L ' Orient {beside him) 
They dare not ! — Ah ! 

[The sound without grows to a roar. 

Count Louis 

What seest thou ? 
De L'Orient 
Malediction ! 

[A cry without. De Vardes, at the window, raises 
his voice. 



OF REASON 179 

D e Vard e s 

Clarice ! Clarice ! 

[There is a faint answering cry, followed by a roar 
from the mob, then silence, 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

O Ciel! 

The Actre ss 
Misericorde ! 

De Vard e s 

*T is done — 't is past — she 's dead. 
O God who makest man, forbear, forbear ! 

\_He covers his face with his hands, There is a 
silence. Gregoire folds his papers. 

Count Louis (with a shaking voice) 

'T is well with her at last ; we need not weep. 

We all must die, for so the play goes on ! 

Her father was a lord of Gascony ; 

A golden spur he wore, and loved the chase ! 

Her mother was more fair than Montespan. 

A thousand times we 've hunted with the King, 

De Miramand and I ; a thousand times 

We Ve watched the moon, that first Clarice and I ! 

Gregoire 
To-morrow, at this hour, another list! 
Meantime, Citoyens, you and you and you, 
And you, Citoyennes, who petitioned so, 
Your prayer is heard. Lalain is merciful ! 
You shall not sleep on these cold stones to-night, 
Another gaol 's provided. Follow me ! 



180 THE GODDESS 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

welcome change ! 

Co unt Louis 

The stones were very cold ! 

The Actress 
And can we have our play there just the same ? 

G re go i re 
Just the same. 

[The prisoners move toward the door. De Vardes 
touches Gregoire on the arm. 

D e Vard e s 

1 find the stones no colder than their wont, 
Time moves no heavier here than everywhere, 
And here, Gregoire, I will remain. The Church 
Will give me up when Carrier calls my name ! 

D e L'Orient 
I will keep you company — 

Gregoire 

As you will — 
To-morrow you '11 be called — you have one night. 
(To the other prisoners.) Follow me. 

\Exeunt all but De Vardes and De L'Orient. 
The latter flings himself upon the bench beneath the 
window ; De Vardes paces to and fro. A silence, 
then De L'Orient sings. 

De L'Orient 

There is an herb, they say, 
Gives light to all the blind. 



OF REASON 181 

' T will be a gracious day 

When I that herb shall find, 
And lighten all the blind I 

Inhere is a leaf that springs , 

Will heal the very sad. 
Ah, would that I had wings 

To find that leaf so glad. 
And heal the very sad! 

There is a bloom o y grace 

Will bring the dead again. 
Ah, for the fiowret's face ! 

Ah, for an end to pain I 
Ah, for the dead again ! 

D e Vard e s 
Why, that 's a mournful thing ! 

De L'Orient 

It was so meant. 
Oh, happy days we sing the saddest things ! — 
My heart is eased. I '11 sleep awhile and dream. 

\He pillows his head upon his arm and sleeps. De 
Vardes walks slowly to and fro. 

D e Varde s 
Sleep ! — How long has it been since Sleep and I 
Met in the heavy road and laid us down, 
Took our dear ease, and let the world go by ? — 
I well remember in the north one time, — 
Beside Moselle, where all the live-long day 
Upon a stairway old we stood on guard, 



182 THE GODDESS 

De Buc and I, and looked on Mutiny, 

Brazen and bold, Death visible and dark ! — 

And all the night before in council spent, 

After a day's forced march from Luneville, 

And a wild night of wine and rapiers drawn. — 

As the sun set we heard a bugle blown, 

Beat of the drums, and thunder of the guns, 

And Bouille's voice, assurance of relief ! — 

Another night of council, then at dawn 

We slept. The moon was crescent and a star 

Shone on to guide the white, enchanted boat 

Through seas of ether coloured like a shell; 

The trees were dark beneath ; there was no sound ; 

The air was cold, — we laid us down and slept. 

Saint Gris ! No dreams did trouble us that day ! — 

\_He rests upon the choir step. 
To bring the dead again ! No flowret blooms, 
No herb, no leaf, shall bring the dead again. 
No garden is there where for all one's gold, 
The weightiest sceptre or the keenest sword, 
Might one obtain the happy gardener's place, 
And find the bloom that brings the dead again. 
It grows not here, and there is naught will serve, 
No rain of tears, no delving earnestly, 
No lift of hope, no squandered treasury, 
Love nor remorse, nor longing nor great pain. 
The star has shot. The dead come not again. 

\He rises and again walks to and fro. 
Happy the dead. — Ah, what of one who lives ? 
What of that mask in this fantastic dance 
Who crowned herself with poison flowers and laughed 
To see the lilies fade before her breath ? — 



OF REASON 183 

O death ! O love ! O blasting treachery ! 
O face that in the prison of La Force 
Visited my dreams — 

\¥he door opens. Yvette leans against it, panting, 
then comes forward. 

Yvette 

Where is the paper ? 

D e Vardes 
The paper ? 

Yvette 
The letter to the judges ! 
Folded and hidden in the purse I sent — 





D e Vard e s 


You sent ? — 






Yvette 




By Seraphine ! You have it, sure ? 




[She looks about her. 


Where is she 


? — The Citoyenne Blancheforet ? 




D e Vard es 


She 's dead. 






Yvette 




No. 




De Vardes 




Yes. 




Yv ETTE 




All is black before me 1 



1 84 THE GODDESS 

D e Vard e s 

They called her name — She said adieu and went. 
They slew her in the street. 

Y V ETTE 

Alas! 

De Vardes 

She 's dead, 
Who was so fair. Why do you say alas ? 

Yvette 
Too late ! — O God, I thought that all was well ! 

D e Vard e s 
Why, so it is ! With her 't is well. She 's dead. 
They say the dead are happy. 

Yvette 

You loved her ! 

D e Vard e s 
Goddess of Reason, no ! Mere friends were we. 
But I Ve a preference for my friends alive ! 

Yvette 
Oh, woe is me ! 

D e Vard e s 
Thou hast what thou didst seek. 
Return to Olympus and hear " All hail, 
Well done, and like a deity! " 

Yvette 

The paper ! 



OF REASON 185 

D e Vard e s 
Thou dream of Paimpont Wood ! — 

YVETTE 

The purse of gold ! 

D e Vard e s 
Thou picture of the Duchess Jeanne ! 

Yvette 

The purse ! 
Give, give ! 

D e Vard e s 

The purse ! — I gave it to Gregoire. 

Yvette 
What! 

D e Vard e s 

It bought five minutes — I did not know 
'T was thine. 

Yvette 
To Gregoire ! You did not open it ! 

D e Vard e s 

No! 

Yvette 

Oh, woe, woe is me ! 

D e Vard e s 

Thou standest there ! 
Still, still the herd girl on the green cliff head 
Who waves her hand to a lost boat at sea ! 
Still, still the vision of a haunted wood 



186 THE GODDESS 

Soulless as is the stone thou leanest on, — 
Vivien musing on the thing she 's done ! 

Y V ETT E 

A slip of paper in a silken purse — 

D e Vard e s 
Wilt thou begone ? The Mountain waits. 

YVETTE 

Too late ! 
Where is Gregoire ? 

D e Vard e s 
I know not. He's away; 
He has thy gold — I 'm sorry for 't. 

Yvette 

No hope ? — 
I thought the bridge was built and both were o'er. 
Then as I passed I heard " To-morrow morn 
Carrier himself will judge that ci-devant." 

D e Vard es 

The Mountain waits — 

Yvette 
I '11 to Lalain again. 

D e Vard e s 
Ha! 

Yvette 
She is dead ; I 'm lost. But thou — But thou - 
Farewell ! Farewell ! 



OF REASON 187 

D e Vard e s 
Thou said'st, / 7/ to Lalain. 
I do forbid it utterly. 

Y v ETTE 

Oh! 

De Vard e s 
Obey! 
It is thy seigneur's last command. 

(To himself,) Thou fool ! 
Touch not her hand. 'T is red ! 

Y v ETTE 

Monseigneur ! 

De Vardes 
Why art thou both so fair and foul a thing ? 

Y v ETTE 
Ay, call me that — I care not ! 

D e Vard e s 

I '11 call thee " Death, 
Sweet Death — fair Treachery ! " 

Yvette 

Forgive, forgive ! 

D e Vard es 
There 's blood upon thy hand. 

Yv ETTE 

Forgive ! 



188 THE GODDESS 

D e Vard e s 

Alas! 
Thou didst betray ! 

Y v ETTE 

I would that I were dead 
In Paimpont Wood, beside the Druid Stone ! 

D e V ard e s 
I would that I had never strayed that way ! 

Y v ETT E 
I won that paper in that purse of gold ! 
And it was life, I tell thee, life for both ! 

God ! how all things here miscarry ! 

D e Vard e s 

1 would that I had never seen thy face ! 

Y v ETT E 
Oh, much I hated her, la belle Marquise, 
And yester morn I did betray her there, 
Just in the moment God gave o'er my soul ! 
And she is dead — I cannot bring her back. 
Oh, swift the madness passed and came remorse, 
And I did hate myself, and strove to save ! — 
Oh, woe, and double woe ! He promised me ! 
Oh, I have striven with a fiend from hell 
And not prevailed, though sorely I did strive! 
O God ! O God ! I m weary of the light ! 
Now, now thou too wilt die unless — unless — 
Ah, let me go — Farewell, a little while ! 

D e Va rd e s 
Not till I know where thou dost go, and why. 



OF REASON 189 

Y V ETT E 

Remond Lalain gave me that paper. 

It was an order, written by himself, 

Whom even Carrier would not offend — 

A secret paper not for every eye. 

Reward he asked for certain services, — 

Two lives, your life and hers — and hers, I swear ! 

He does not leave his villa all this day, 

But at the judgment bar you were to show 

That paper to Lambertye or Sarlat, 

And both were saved — both, both, I swear it, both! 

And now she 's dead — 'T was life you flung away 

Shut in that purse ! You gave it to Gregoire ! 

Gregoire ! He serves the Revolution, 

Is flint to all beside ! Oh me ! Oh me ! 

I could not come myself, I could but send. 

I won it not till cockcrow of this morn ! 

D e Vard es 
Till cockcrow ! 

Y V ETTE 

The dawn came slowly on. 
The cock crew and I drew the curtain by 
And saw the morning star above the Loire ! 

D e Vard e s 
The morning star ! 

Y v ETT E 
'T was like the eye of God ! 
I used to watch it from the fields at dawn; 
This morn 't was watching me ! 



i 9 o THE GODDESS 

D e Vard e s 

Remond Lalain ! 

Y v E TT E 
'T was all in vain. She 's dead — ah, ages since ! 
You '11 not forgive — So fare you well again ! 

D e Vard e s 
Where goest thou, Yvette ? 

Yvette 

To Seraphine, 
Beneath the Lanterne, Sign of the Hour Glass! 

D e Vard e s 
Hear and obey ! It is a dying man 
Speaks to thee now and with authority ! — 
Thy seigneur too, and head of all thy house. 
When I am dead, the last of the De Vardes 
Will be thyself, my cousin ! — All song doth say 
That Duchess Jeanne who lived so long ago, 
Whose pictured face and thine are counterparts, 
E'en to the shadowy hair, the cheek's soft curve, 
The light of eye, the slow, enchanting smile, — 
All song doth say she had a bruised heart, 
But in God's sight a height of soul ! So thou. 
Go thou to Morbec. Leave this Babylon. 
Back ! from the travelled road thy foot 's upon ! 
List not unto the music that is played ; 
Touch not the scarlet flowers, the honey-sweet, 
They '11 poison thee ! Think not the light is fair, 
It is false dawn. Take thou the darkling way 
Shall lead thee to white light and lasting bloom ! 



OF REASON 191 

Go thou to Morbec. Take thy distaff up, 
Spin thou thy flax and listen to old tales, 
Peacefully, with that smile upon thy lip ! 
Or in the dewy dawn lift up thy head 
From dreamless sleep and drive thy cows afield, 
Stand mid the golden broom and mark the mist 
Rise from the hidden sea, and hear the lark 
Singing afar his strain of heavenly hope, — 
So wear thy years away, ah, tranquilly ! — 
Thou art so young — All this will come to seem 
A dream of yesternight — 

Y v ETTE 

Dost thou forgive ? 

D e Vardes 
And at the last when Death shall take thy hand, 
Smile at the due caress, and lightly come — 
If I am I, I '11 meet thee on the strand ! 







IVETTE 


Dost 


thou forgive ? 


D e Vard es 
I love ! 

Y VETTE 

Me? 

D e Vard e s 

Thou sayest. 
Yvette 


Where is the music 


playing? 






D e Vard e s 






Long ago, 



192 THE GODDESS 

To Paris and my King I rode away, 

Long ago, in the freshness of the world! 

I left thee there, all safe in convent fold — 

Fair were the fruit trees in that garden old, 

Warm shone the sun, the silver fountain played. 

I left thee there and thought to find again, 

When King and Crown were saved and devoir done, 

The battle o'er, the bugles sounding peace ! — 

The King he is in heaven, the Crown is lost, 

The battle 's to the strong, the war drum rattles on. 

Long lay I in the prison of La Force ; 

A dream I had that thou wouldst wait for me, 

Beside the fountain, by the bright fruit trees. 

Thou must have known that bars kept me from thee ! 

Thou must have known that I did love thee true ! 

Thou must have known that I did longing wait 

The rainbow after storm, the halcyon time 

When, stilled the jar and discord of the mind, 

The all unfettered heart might speak of love ! 

But ah, the garden 's sealed. Thou art not there ! 

Thou wouldst not wait the while — 

Y v ETT E 

Outside I kneel; 
Outside the garden, outside Paradise! 
Oh, woe ! Oh, bliss! 

D e Vard es 
Weep not ! 

Y V ETTE 

I love thee so! 
D e Vard e s 
Paimpont ! Paimpont ! I feel thy magic wind ! 



OF REASON 193 

Reenter Gregoire. 

Gre goire 
Citoyen Vardes — 

Y v ETTE 
Gregoire, Gregoire ! the purse — 
The purse of gold ! — 

Gregoire 
Hein ? , 

D e Vard e s 

Let be ! Let be ! 

No purse was there ! Dost hear, dost hear, Yvette ? 
No purse, no gold, no paper, no Lalain ! 
Thou dost not think that I would take my life ? 

Yvette 
No! 

De Vardes 
Well said, and like the Duchess Jeanne ! 
Let not Gregoire mistake thee either ! 

Yvette 
I said I know not what, Gregoire, nor why ! 
Sometimes a woman says she knows not what. 
Why should I talk of purses, faith, now why ! 

Gregoire 
What do you here, Citoyenne ? 

Yv ETTE 

I know not. 
I strayed this way, a gaoler let me in. 
'T is of the sights of Nantes, this church, this gaol ! 



i 9 4 THE GODDESS 

Gregoire (to De Vardes) 
I have in charge to guard you through the street 
To the old Prison of the Seminaire. 
They who lodge there go onward to the Loire ! 

[He turns to De L'Orient. 

De Vardes (to Yvette) 
Oh, sunken eyes! Oh, cheek so deadly pale ! 
Oh, rest thee, rest thee, child, in still Morbec ! 
Our Lady guard thee, guide thee with her hand. 
Farewell — 

Yvette 

I '11 walk upon the banks of Loire. 

D e Vard e s 

No ; come not there ! 

Yv ETTE 

I must. It is my road. 

Gregoire (He touches De L ' Orient upon the 

shoulder) 

Awake, poet, and go along with us ! 

D e L'Orient 
I am awake ! 'T is trudge again, De Vardes ! 

Come, Fanchon and Babette, 

Olympe and Josephine I 
tfhe dancers all are met 
Within the forest green ! 
Cerise to me> 
Denise to thee, 
But none to Ueontine ! 

\He turns with Gregoire to the door at left of the 
altar. 



OF REASON 195 

D e Vard e s 
Farewell — my douce! 

Yv ETTE 

Farewell — my fisherman! 



Oh — 

Come ! 



Gr EGO IRE 



De L'Ori ent 

The dancers all are met 
Within the forest green ! 

[Exeunt De Vardes, De L'Orient, and Gregoire. 

The church darkens. Yvette moves to the choir 
step. 

Yv ETT E 

Oh, love in my heart! Oh, splendour and light! 
The bow in the sky, the bird at its height ! 
The glory and state of the angels bright ! 

[She kneels and stretches out her arms to the altar. 
Oh, mother of sorrows ! 

C U R TAIN 










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ACT V 



SCENE I 



A Judgment Hall in Nantes. A dais upon which at a heavy 
table sit several members of the Revolutionary Committee. 
Behind them soldiers and a great tricolour flag. To one 
side a tribune draped with tricolour ; opposite the tribune 
a gallery filled with women of the Revolution. Upon the 
floor of the hall a throng of red-capped men. To the right 
of the dais a number of the accused^ men and women. To 
the left a small group of the condemned. 

Uproar in the hall. An accused who has been standing be- 
fore the judges rejoins the right-hand group of prisoners. 
One of the judges rings the bell on the table before him. 



S' 



The Judge 
LENCE, Citoyennes in the gallery! 
You disturb judgment ! 



Celeste {leaning from the gallery) 

We would know up here 
Why you did free that man ? 

The Judge {soothingly) 

Ah, Citoyenne ! 
He 's not free — he 's but acquitted ! 

Celeste 

Ah, well ! 



198 THE GODDESS 

That 's different ! 

{To the women about her.) He 's but acquitted ! 

The Women {They nod their heads) 

Ah! 
Enter Lalain with Nanon and Angelique. 

Celeste 

He ! Angelique ! Nanon ! 

[Nanon and Angelique make their way through 
the press to the gallery stairs. 

The Crowd 

Remond Lalain. 

A Judge 
Thy place is here, Lalain ! 

Lalain 

Make way, my friends. 
The Levee 's thronged to-day. 

The C ro wd 

Ha, ha, 't is so ! 
Levee of the Citoyen Carrier! 

Vive la Republique! Vive Remond Lalain! 

[Lalain sits beside the judges. 

A Judge {to a gaoler) 
The next. 

The Gaol e r 
Dog of a priest ! 

[The Abbe approaches the bar. 



OF REASON 199 

Th e Abbe 

On yesterday, 
Messieurs the Judges, you acquitted me. 

A Jud GE 
It is to-day. 

The Abbe 

Citoyen Lambertye — 

Lambertye {hastily) 
I give thee o'er — I give thee o'er — 

The Abbe 

Parbleu ! 
Samaritan ! Would I had played Levite ! 
And left thee in the ditch with every wound 
Till Satan came to hale his minion forth ! — 
Well, with this life I 've done ! 

First Judge 

Thou art a priest. 

The Abbe 
Granted. 

S econd Judge 
Death ! 

A Tricoteuse (from the gallery) 
He ! Citoyen, below there ! 
I 've dropped my knitting. Throw it here to me ! 

Third Judge 
Thou hast aided emigres. 

The Abbe 

Granted. 



200 THE GODDESS 

Second Judge 

Death ! 
First Judge 
And written unto exiles. 

The Abbe 
Granted. 

Second Judge 

Death ! 

Third Judge 

Thou hast been heard to scorn and to lament 
That which the Revolution hath achieved ! 

The Abbe 
Scorn and lament ! Why, no, I Ve wept with joy 
To see the things the Revolution hath achieved ! 
As — 

First Judge 
As what ? 

The Abbe 
Why, thou death's-head, many things ! 
It did achieve, for one, my brother's death! 

Third Judge 
Dost thou mourn for him ? 

The Abbe 

Ay! 

Second Judge 
Death ! 



OF REASON 201 

The Abbe 
Achieve ! I like the word. Achieve, achieve ! 
Ruin and downfall, death and waste of fame ! 
Achievement of the Revolution ! Ha, 
I '11 tell thee, farceur, what it hath achieved : 
It hath achieved the death of the Gironde, 
Death of Marat, and death of D'Orleans, 
Death of great part of its abhorred brood ! 
It hath achieved the Company of Marat ; 
It hath achieved Jacques Carrier in Nantes ; 
It shall achieve more death and infamy ! 
Death ! The word you are so fond of. Death ! 
And Infamy, the thing you can't bestow ! 
It shall achieve the death of Carrier, 
The death of Lambertye and of Lalain, 
The death of Danton and of Robespierre ! — 
Nature will give a grave obscene and dark, 
And Time will see that docks and darnels grow ! 

[Uproar. 
The First Judge 

Death, — stand aside, condemned. 

Enter Seraphine. 

Celeste 

Ah, Seraphine, 

Come up here, Seraphine ! 

[Seraphine mounts the stair and sits beside Celeste, 
Angelique, and Nanon. 

Nanon 

Where is Yvette ? 

Seraphine 
I know not, I ! 



202 THE GODDESS 

Angelique 
I saw her gliding by, 
Beneath the moon, last night when all was still. 
Against a cannon in the empty square 
She leaned, and on the river looked. 

Seraphine 

What harm ? 
Ange lique 
Why, none ! 

Celeste (her eyes upon the prisoners below) 
Ha, ha ! it is the old man's turn ! 

A Gaoler 
Chateau-Gui ! 

The Woman 

Ah, Chateau-Gui ! 

First Judge 

Chateau-Gui! 

Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

O my father ! 

Count Louis 

Unclasp thy hands, my child ! 
What is it, Lambertye ? 

First Judge 

Thou ci-devant, 
Thou art accused, imprimatur, of this : 
Once thou didst serve Capet ! 

Count Louis 

The King? 



OF REASON 203 

First Judge 

Capet. 

Count Louis 

I served the King of France. 

First Judge 
Twice over, death! For thou didst serve Capet; 
For thou dost dare say the King of France ! 

Count Louis 
The King of France ! 

The Crowd 

Ah! — 

Count Louis 

Son of Saint Louis ! 



Ah! — 



The Crowd 

Count Louis 
Royal Martyr ! 

The Crowd 
Ah— h— h. 



Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 

O my father ! 

Third Judge 
All titles, terms of honour and of state, 
Majesty and reverence are forbid, 



2o 4 THE GODDESS 

Not to be spoken! They are ci-devants, 
They are condemned. 

The Crowd 
Condemned ! 

Count Louis 

Ha, ci-devants, 
Titles and symbols, names and attributes, 
Condemned for splendour and for high estate ! 
Ha, Croix de Saint Louis ! Ha, Chateau-Gui ! 
Thou goest to heaven in famous company : 
King, Saint, Martyr, Reverence, Majesty. — 
Best make the company a regiment — 
Regiment du Roi, in vestments gorgeous ! 
Forbidden words ! Who says to me " forbid " ? 
Ye sans-culottes, ye bourgeois, creeping things, 
Adders and asps that slew a king and queen ! 
I am a courtier of the olden time 
Who served le Grand Monarque, knew Mazarin, 
And in a Court shall still be courtier, 
Croix de Saint Louis, with the grande entr'ee. 
While ye do prowl in filthy ways of hell, 
Nor hardly see its red-lit CEil-de-bceuf 
Where everlasting Terror, groaning, reigns, — 
But, being lackeys, keep the lackeys' place ! 

First Judg e 
Enough ! 

Second Judge 
Death ! 

The Crowd 

Death ! The Loire ! 



OF RE A SON 205 

Count Louis 

O Kings of France ! 
O sons of Clovis and of Charlemagne ! 
Louis the Pious and the Debonair ! 
Philippe August and Fair, and Charles the Wise ! 
And thou the sainted King, the Blessed Louis ! 
And Charles Bien-Aime, Victorieux, 
Crowned by the maiden of Domremy ! 
And the good King Henri, Henri the Great ! 
Louis the Just, Louis le Grand Monarque ! 
Louis the Loved, and Louis lately dead, 
The Martyr King, the Martyr, Martyr King ! — 
O Kings of France in that fair land ye be, 
To your chateaux and to your palaces 
Prepare to welcome dying loyalty ! 
For knightly faith is marching forth from France. 
Throne, sceptre, orb, and majesty have passed, 
Ermine and coronet and spur of gold, 
Renown and splendid honour, valiant sway, 
Ancien Regime, noblesse of old France ! 
The orirlamme upon its golden stem, 
The banner of the lilies waving high ! — 

The Crowd 

Ah — 

Count Louis 
The lily banner and the orirlamme ! 
Forgotten yonder stripes of shame and woe ! 

The Crowd 
The tricolour ! Death ! The Loire ! 



206 THE GODDESS 

First Judge 

Death to-night ! 

Coun t Louis 
Nightshade, mandrake, and hemlock o'er ye wave ! — 
But I am going where, I make no doubt, 
The favourite flower is still the fleur-de-lis ! 

The Crowd 
Ah ! 

Count Louis 
And the word forbid is republique! 

The Crowd 
Down ! down ! 

Count Louis 

Princes and peers of France ! 

First Judge 

Have done ! 
Count Louis 
Anjou, Lorraine ! 

The Crowd 

Ah— h— h! 

Count Louis 

Bourbon and Valois ! 

[Uproar in the hall. Mlle. de Chateau-Gui 
clings to her father s arm. 

Forbidden words ! Well, well, my child, I 'm done ! 
My breath is out. — Forbidden words ! Ma foi ! 
'T is to my taste to deal in contraband ! 

[The First Judge rings the bell violently. The tu- 
mult subsides. 



OF REASON 207 

A Gaoler 
Chateau-Gui, take place beside the priest ! 

Th e Abbe 

Ah, 
Monsieur le Comte ! 

Count Louis 
Monsieur r Abbe ! 

\_He offers his snuff-box. 

First Judge 

The next. 

Enter Yvette. 'The crowd murmurs as it makes way. 

Th e Crowd 
Yvette Charruel ! 

A Man 

Goddess of Reason ! 
[Yvette mounts the stair to the gallery and sits be- 
side Seraphine. 

Celeste 
So pale ! 

Angelique 
No rose ? 

Nanon 

Only her lips are red. 

Celeste 
So heavy-eyed ? 

Yvette 

I have not slept. 

A Young Girl {near her) 

Oh, oh, 
Thy voice ! 'T is like a violin playing ! 



2o8 THE GODDESS 

Angelique 
I know thou didst not sleep. — How looked the Loire 
Beneath the moon last night ? 

Yvette 

Much as 't will look 
Beneath the moon to-night. 

\With her chin upon her hand she studies the throng 
below. 

S E RAPHINE 

The prisoners — 

Yvette 
Who rises there ? 

First Judge 

Thou ci-devant, De Vardes ! 

The Crowd 
De Vardes ! De Vardes ! Aristocrat ! De Vardes ! 

D e Vard e s 
Remond Lalain — 

L AL AI N 

Rene de Vardes. 

D e Vard e s 

This court — 
Pray you conceive it is some greensward trim, 
My cartel sent, received, the duel fought, 
And thou the victor, since so wags the world, 
Heart's blood of mine upon thy rapier dark ! 
And I the vanquished in the sight of men, 
Drowsing to death upon the bloody sod. 
And all this folk but seconds, witnesses, 



OF REASON 209 

They are not here, nor there ; we are the men ! 
Now, seeing death hath some prerogative, 
I charge thee stand, antagonist ! nor leave 
This sunny field with thy triumphant friends 
Until I bid thee go ! 

Lalain 
I hear ! 
(To the crowd.) Silence ! 

D e Vard e s 
When I do think that once I called thee friend, 
My wonder grows ! The orchard 's blooming now 
Where we did lie at length on summer eves 
The while the mavis sang and sea winds blew, 
And to the nodding clover droned the bee, — 
Two striplings couched beneath an apple tree, 
Talking of knights at arms and paladins 
And what we each would dare in worthy cause ! 
That brow of thine was not so swarthy then, 
Thine eyes were frank, we read from the same book 
The deeds of Palmerin and Amadis. 
Then up we lightly rose and went our way, 
Hand touching hand, — Orestes, Pylades ! 
I, Jonathan the Prince, and David thou ! 
The figure holds, for Jonathan will die, 
But wilt thou mourn him, David ? No, I say ! — 
Nor o'er his kingdom shalt thou reign, Remond ! 

Lalain 

Rene — 

D e Vard e s 

I am, monsieur, the Baron of Morbec ! 



zio THE GODDESS 

The Crowd 
Ah! 

L ALAIN 

Silence ! 
(To De Vardes.) As thou wilt ! He is long dead 
That youth thou namest David. 

De Vardes 

Ay, Citoyen, 
He slew himself. I see his punishment. 



Lalain 



Oh! — 



D e Vard e s 
Wretched man ! What hast thou done ? I know, 
And thou, Remond, dost know I know! Enough. 
O better far to lie upon this sod 
And hear the wings of death above my head, 
Than to be thou, thou stained conqueror ! 
Dishonoured thou from helm to bloody heel ! 
Enough ! When the cock crows and the morning star 
Shines steadfast over Loire I shall be gone. 
One stays, that 's God. Do thou beware, Remond, 
For God will hearken unto Jonathan — 
Thou canst not hurt a flower that he loved ! 

Lalain 
No? 

D e Vard e s 
No! 

Lalain 
Thou mightst have had thy life — 



OF REASON 


21 I 


D e Vard e s 

Y V ETTE 


I? 

\He laughs. 



Air! 
You hem me in, Citoyennes ! Air ! de grace I 

N ANO N 

The air is good enough for us, Yvette ! 

Angelique 
Why do you grow so pale, so pale, Yvette, 

[Yvette takes from her hair the bonnet-rouge. 

S E RAP H I N E 

Psst ! Little fool ! Put on the cap again ! 

Yvette 
It is too heavy ! 

Seraphine 

Saint Yves ! Put it on ! 

De Vardes 
The duel 's o'er; the night is drawing on; 
Dark is thy form against the crimson sky, 
Remond Lalain ! Stand further off, my foe ! 
And now I think I see thee not at all, 
And that is well ! I would forget thee quite. 
Live out thy life unto its sordid close ! 
Live on, and in the future find the past ! 
But while thou treadest earth touch not again 
That flower I spoke of ! Touch it not, Lalain ! 

Lalain 
Draws on the night — 



212 THE GODDESS 

De Vardes 
I '11 bathe me in the Loire ! 
Death has been ever called a River wide. 
This ford I fear not ! — Soldier of the King, 
I '11 pass the stream, though cold, though cold and dark ! 
The bivouac lights are shining through the trees, 
He waits within my tent, my General ! 

First Judge 
Death ! 

Second Judge 
Death ! 

D e Vard e s 
Now sheath thy sword, Remond ! 
The field of honour leave to death and me ! 

[He crosses to the condemned. 

Count Louis 
Monsieur le Baron ! 

The Abbe 
Rene de Vardes ! 

D e Vard e s 
Monsieur le Comte, Monsieur l'Abbe, again 
I find myself in best of company ! 

\fthe judges whisper together. Lalain, his eyes 
upon the floor, drums upon the table with his hand. 
Yvette unpins the tricolour cockade from her breast, 
gazes upon it for a moment, then throws it from her. 
'The women about her watch her .greedily. 

Seraphine 
Name of a name ! Yvette ! 



OF REASON 213 

Y V ETTE 

I like white best. 

S E RAP HI N E 

Saint Gildas ! Saint Maudez ! 

Yv ETTE 

I ever loved 
The fleur-de-lis ! 

S E RAPHINE 

Saint Yves le Veridique ! 

Y v e T t e (She rises) 
God and the King ! 

[Uproar in the hall All turn toward the gallery. 

A Judge 
Who cried that ? 

A Breton Sailor 

Sainte Vierge ! 
Yvette Charruel ! 

L AL AI N 

No! 

D e Varde s 
Mon Dieu ! 

The Crowd 

Yvette — 
Yvette Charruel ! 

S E RAPHIN E 

Saint Servan ! Saint Linaire ! 



214 THE GODDESS 

Y V ETTE 

I denounce the Citoyen Remond Lalain ! 

The Crowd 
Ah! — 

N AN O N 

Ah, let me get at her ! 

Lalain 

Citoyens ! 
Heed her not — she 's mad ! — The next prisoner ! 

Y v E TT E 
I denounce Carrier and Lambertye ! 
Chicanneau, Sarlat, Petit-Pierre, and Gaye, 
The Company of Marat, the hideous deaths, 
The Noyades and the Dragonades of Nantes ! 
I tell you that the blood you shed must stop ! 
One cannot sleep at night with thinking on 't. 
You put to sleep, O God ! too many ! 

Th e C rowd 

Ah! — 
A Voice 
There is no God ! nor ever was in Nantes ! 

Another Voice 
She has spoken against the Republic ! 

Y VETT E 

There was a glory in the morning sky, 
Where now is naught but miserable red ! 
A trumpet blew, but we have listened since 



OF REASON 215 

To the false jingle of a tambourine ! 

There stood a mighty judge, robed, calm and proud, 

Where is he now ? I see but murderers ! 

A Voice 

But murderers ! 

Y v ETT E 

I denounce the Republic ! 

[Uproar. 
The Crowd 

Oh, harlotry ! — No, blasphemy ! — Down, down ! 
The Bar ! the Judgment Bar ! — The river ! — Death ! 
The Loire ! 

YVETTE 

I am coming. 

[She descends the stair. Men and women clutch her 
and thrust her forward to the bar. 

I am here ! 
I am Yvette, called Right of the Seigneur. 
My mother was the peasant girl, Yvonne ; 
My father was the Baron of Morbec. 
I am tired of Ca ira, Carmagnole, 
I would sleep with the Loire for my pillow ! 

The Crowd 
Ah— h— h ! 

L AL AI N 

A head beside thine on that pillow ! 

D e Vard e s 
Mon Dieu ! 

Yv ETTE 

Perhaps, Citoyen ! 



216 THE GODDESS 

A Voice 

I denounce 
Yvette Charruel ! 

Other Voices 

And I! — And I! — And I ! 

CUR TAIN 



SCENE II 

The banks of the Loire. Night. Branching trees ; between 
their trunks is seen the river. There is a full moon, but a 
drifting mist obscures the scene. In the background, upon 
the river bank, dimly appears a crowd of the condemned, 
men, women, and children, soldiers and executioners of the 
Company of Marat. From this throng comes a low, con- 
tinued, confused sound of command, entreaty, distress, and 
lamentation. In the foreground the condemned form into 
groups or move singly to and fro. 

Enter Yvette from the shadow of the trees. 

A Soldier {following her) 
Hola ! Give us not the slip ! 

Yvette 

Thou soldier ! 
There is no gold could make me flee this place ! 
How long dost think before they throw me in ? 

Th e Soldier 
A little while ! 

\_He returns to the river. Yvette sits upon the 
earth at the foot of a tree, and with her chin upon 
her hand watches those who come and go. 



OF REASON 217 

YVETTE 

He comes not yet ! O Our Lady! 
I would not drown till I have seen him once! 

A Woman (passing with a man) 
How shines the moon ! Did we not always say, 
We two would die by such a moon as this ? 
Rememberest thou — 

The M an 
Rememberest thou that night, 
That Versailles night within the Orangerie? 

Th e Woman 
Rememberest thou — 

[They pass. 
A Soldier (calling to another) 

To bind them hand and foot, 
We need more rope ! 

The Second Soldier 

Just thrust them in the stream 
With bayonets! 

A Cry from the River 
Misericorde ! 
[A child with flowers in her hand speaks to Yvette. 

The Child 

I 'm tired — 

Yvette 
Rest here, thou little bird! 



218 THE GODDESS 

The Child 

My name 's Aimee. 
I did not know that flowers grew at night. 
Is that the moon? 

Y VETT E 

It is the silver moon! 
Aimee 's a pretty name. My name 's Yvette. 

The Child 
Kiss me, Yvette — I '11 look now for Ursule ! 

Yvette 
Who is Ursule ? 

The Child 
My bonne — Adieu, Yvette! 

[The child passes on. 

Voices from the River 

Helas ! Helas ! Misericorde ! 

\_A nun advances from the shadow. She is in ecstasy, 
her hands clasped, her eyes raised. 

The Nun 
The skies open : heaven appears ! 
Heaven my home ! 
O for the wings of the dove, 
The eagle's speed ! 
The gates of pearl are opening, 
My harp is strung. 
The Virgins come to meet me. 
Sainte Agnes, Sainte Claire ! 
Our Lady stoops to greet me. 



OF REASON 219 

My father smiles. 

My brothers two I see there ! 

Who is that one 

Who kneels and to me beckons ? 

'T is he I loved ! 

What radiance grows, what splendour? 

Who waiting stands ? 

Light ! O Light ! O Christ my Lord ! 

Heaven my home ! 

Love ! O Death, come quickly ! 

1 would be gone ! 

\A soldier touches her on the arm. 

The Soldier 
Thy time it is ! 

[The nun regards him with a radiant and dazzling 
smile, then turns and moves swiftly before him to the 
river. 

The Voic e s 

Woe, woe ! Misericorde ! 

Y v ETT E 
Heaven my home ! Shall I see heaven then ? 
Oh me ! so much of ill thou 'st done, Yvette ! 
Alas ! Alas ! What if I cannot win 
To heaven ! but must ever weeping stand 
With all the lost and strain my eyes to see 
The form I love move 'neath the living trees, 
And all in vain, so great the distance is ! — 
Not see him ! O Our Lady, let me in ! 

The Voi c e s 
Woe, woe ! — I die ! — I die ! — O countrymen ! 



220 THE GODDESS 

Yv ETTE 

O God, and is it true I murdered her, 
That lady high, that fair, so fair Clarice ? 
O God ! I would that she were happy here, 
Alive and laughing, gay of heart again ! 
O God ! I do repent me of my sin ! 

The Voic e s 
Ayez pitie ! 

\_From a group of the condemned is heard the voice 
of The Abbe. 

The Abbe 

Miserere mei Deus 
Secundum magnam misericordiam tuam ! 

The Condemned {kneeling) 
Have mercy, O God ! 

Voices from the River 

Misericorde ! 

[Yvette kneels. 
The Abbe 

In manus tuas Domine commendo spiritum meum, 
Redemisti me Domine Deus veritatis ! 

The Condemned 
O God, receive our souls ! 

Voices from the River 
Woe, woe ! We die ! 

Soldiers 
That one is swimming there ! Your musket ! Fire! — 

\_A musket shot. 



OF REASON 221 

Ha, ha ! Ha, ha ! 

The Abbe 

Dulcissime Domine Jesu Christe, 

Per virtutem sanctissimae Passionis tuae 

Recipe me in numerum electorum tuorum ! 

The Condemned 
O Christ, receive our souls ! O Christ who died ! 

The Abbe 

Maria> Mater gratiae. Mater misercordiae, 
Tu me ab hoste protege ', et hora mortis suscipe ! 

The Cond emned 

O mother of God ! 

Voice s 

Misericorde ! 

The Abbe 

Omnes sancti Angeli, et omnes Sancti 
Inter cedite pro me, et mihi succurrite ! 

Voice s 
Misericorde ! 

Soldiers 

Petit- Pierre ! — Andre ! 
'T is time for yonder folk beneath the trees ! 

The Abbe 

Ego te absolvo a peccatis tuis, 

In nomine Patris, et Fi/ii y et Spiritus Sancti. 

Amen ! 

[The condemned arise from their knees. 



222 THE GODDESS 

The Soldiers 

Come your ways ! 

[The Abbe and the condemned vanish into the mist 
upon the river bank. 

Voic e s 

Ayez pitie ! 

[Yvette rises from her knees. She plucks the yellow 
broom that grows beneath the trees. 

Yvette 
And if I may I will her servant be, 
And I will bring her posies every day! 

The Voice s 
We die ! 

Soldiers 
So, two and two ! Ha, ha ! 

[There appears in mid-stream on the river Carrier's 
festal barge. It is lit from stem to stern. There is 
music aboard, singing and revelry of men and women. 

Laughter from the River 
Ha, ha ! Ha, ha ! Ha, ha ! 

The Voi ce s 

They laugh ! They sing ! 
\_A sound of singing from the passing barge. 

A Woman's Voic e 

Fair Chloris bathed her in the flood, 
Toung Damon watching, trembling stood, 
Behind the frailest hawthorn wall ! 
The month was May — 



OF REASON 223 

A Man's Voice 

No, Prairial ! 

The Woman's Voice 

Her ivory limbs they gleamed and turned. 
Young Damon s heart so hotly burned. 
Into the stream he leaped therefor I 
It seemed July — 

The Man's Voice 

No, Thermidor ! 

\_The barge passes. 

Voices from the River 
O hearts so hard ! 

Other Voi c e s 
Oh, woe ! Adieu ! Adieu ! 

\_A n old woman speaks to Yvette. 

The Old Woman 
They 've drowned my son, my sailor son Michel ! 
Oh, oh, my heart ! he 's drifting out to sea ! 

Yvette 
Poor mother ! 

The Old Woman 
Oh, to and fro he sailed, he sailed ! 
The Indies knew him and the Northern Seas ! 
He 'd bide at home a bit, then off he 'd go, 
Another voyage make, strange things to see ! 
Then home he'd come and of his travels tell. 
Oh, oh, my son, my sailor son Michel ! 

[The old woman passes on. 



224 THE GO DDES S 

Enter Seraphine. 

S E RAPH IN E 

I 've sought her here, I 've sought her there, in vain ! 
And perilous it is to seek one here ! 

Y v ETT E 
Seraphine ! 

S E RAPHINE 

Yvette ! 

YVETTE 

Where is monseigneur ? 

Seraphine {weeping) 
I know not, I ! — Saint Lazaire and Saint Jean ! 
I nursed thee ere thou wast so high ! 

Yvette 
Poor Seraphine ! Dear Seraphine ! 

Seraphine 

Alack ! 
They 're watching there ! 

Yvette 
Oh, then away ! 
'T is death to weep for one who dies ! Away ! 

Seraphine {weeping) 
Oh, oh ! When thou wast but a little thing 
Thou hadst the coaxing ways ! Alack ! Alack ! 

Yvette 
Poor Seraphine ! 



OF REASON 225 

S E RAPH INE 

Dost mind the sunny path 
Up the steep cliff to chapel in the woods ? 

Yvette 
I mind — I mind — To thy warm hand I clung, 
A little child. Now I must walk alone ! 

S E RAPHIN E 

Oh, oh ! And thou wast Goddess yesterday, 
The fairest Goddess ever seen, they say ! 

Yvette 
Speak not of that ! 

A Voice {calling) 

Seraphine ! Seraphine ! 

Yvette 
It warns, that voice ! Adieu, adieu, adieu ! 
Thou must begone ! 

Seraphine 

If I do look at thee 
I '11 stay forever here ! Adieu ! Adieu ! — 
Oh well-a-day! Oh well, oh well-a-day! 

[Exit Seraphine. 
Yv ETT E 

So late it grows, so long I 've waited here ! 
I feel the morning air ! — Will he not come ? 
O God ! what if they Ve slain him otherwhere ? 
Ha ! Death is busy far and near to-night ! 
They may have shot him yonder by the sea ! 
He may have sunk above, below this place ! 



226 THE GODDESS 

Though Gregoire swore to me it would be here, 

Here where they brought me would they bring him too, 

And ere the set of moon we would be gone ! — 

God ! The cries of drowning men I 've heard, 
But not his voice among them ! No, no, no ! 
He '11 make no moan, he will die loftily ! — 
Ah, God ! only to see him ere I drown ! 

The Voic e s 
Misericorde ! 

Soldiers 

Prenez garde ! Hake la ! 

A Man's Voice 

1 die who fought for France in bloody fields ; 
At Lille I fought, at Bordeaux, Avignon ! 



A soldier ! 



A soldier ! 



Y v ETTE 

\_Another voice sings hoarsely. 

The Voic e 

Tremblez, tyrans ! et vous perfides, 
Uopprobre de tous les partis I 
Tremblez, vos projets parricides 
Viennent enfin recevoir leur prix ! 
Tout est soldat pour vous combattre — 

[The voice dies. 
Yv ETTE 

Another Voice 
Diantre ! A whiff of grapeshot now, 



OF REASON 227 

A sabre-cut, or e'en a trampling charge ! 

But this cold death — r _ 7 

[The voice dies. 

Yvette 

A soldier ! 

Anoth e r Voice 

Baste ! I '11 tell 
The Due de Biron — 

Yvette 
All soldiers ! 

Enter De Vardes and Gregoire. 

Gregoire 
I tell you truth, monsieur — 

D e Vard e s 

So dense the throng 
I have looked up and down for this long hour, — 
This hour so long, this hour so fatal short, 
Seeing it is my latest hour of life, 
And that I cannot find her whom I seek ! 

Gregoire 
She is not dead, monsieur ! 

D e Vard e s 

So many are ! 

Gregoire 
I would have known. 



228 THE GODDESS 

De Vardes 

Some aeons past thou wast 
A serviceable fellow ! Get thee gone ! 
And if thou findest her, I '11 give thee thanks, 
I have no gold — 

Gregoire 

Monsieur le Baron — 

D e Vard e s 

Go! 

[Exit Gregoire. 
And if I find her not, if time shall fail, 
Then through thy labyrinth, Eternity, 
Love's silken clue shall lead me safe at last — 

Yv ETT E 

Monseigneur ! 

[De Vardes turns. 
D e Vard e s 

Yvette ! 

[Two soldiers of the Company of Marat pass beneath 
the trees. 

The First Soldier 

'T is near the cockcrow ! 
What devil's work we 've had, and have ! 

The Second Soldier 

Courage ! 
There are not so many now ! Then home and sleep ! 

[ 'They pass. 
D e Vard e s 

Oh, rest thee on thy lover's breast, my heart ! 



OF REASON 229 

My life, my love, my dear, my Duchess Jeanne ! 
Oh, 'neath the moon thou 'rt like a lily flower ! 

Yvette 
Rene, Rene ! 

De Vardes 

Thy lips ! 

\jThey kiss. 
No, no, thou 'rt not 
That Vivien whom I did call thee once. 
She was an evil fay; thou 'rt pure and good ! 
Nor art thou that fair piteous Duchess Jeanne 
Who died for love, whose look thou wearest now ! 
Thou never wast that woman star-begirt, 
Whom they did hail as Goddess here in Nantes. 
No Goddess thou, thou wan and broken flower ! — 
This is green Morbec, thou 'rt the herd girl there 
And I thy fisher, home from out the west. 
My heart, my love, my silver rose, my douce! 

Yvette 
The flowers drifting from the fragrant trees ! 
Unearthly light — 

[They kiss. 
D e Vard e s 

Now come, Eternity ! 

Voices from the River 
It is so sad to die ! — No, no, 't is sweet ! 
Adieu, adieu ! 

Soldiers 

So, down ! Ha, ha! Les Noces 
Republicaines ! 



2 3 o THE GODDESS 

De Vardes 
Les Noces Republicaines ! 

Y V ETTE 

'Tis what they call this death — 

Soldiers 

So near the dawn ! 
Here are the tricoteuses. 

Voices of Women 

Not yet they Ve done ! 
Diantre ! So many weddings in one night ! 
Here are the girls from Carrier's barge at last ! 

Other Voic e s 
Petit-Pierre ! Andre ! 

Soldiers 
Celeste — Nanon ! 
Zephine, 'Toinette ! 

The Women 
Vive le son ! vive le son ! 
Dansons la Carmagnole I 

A Tricoteuse 
'T is light enough to knit ! I J ll sit me down. 
Fi ! how the grass is trampled here ! 

A Soldier 

Lalain and Lambertye — 

A Woman 
We left them there 
Upon the barge, Lalain and Lambertye; 



OF REASON 231 

And they were drinking deep, and dicing too, 
And Lalain had his arm round Angelique ! 

[ft hey laugh. 
D e Vard e s 
Seest thou not through yonder trees the stone, 
The Druid Stone where I did see thee first 
When thou didst lie asleep upon the grass ? 
How long I stood and looked, thou dost not know ! 

Y VETTE 

Beside the stream I slept and dreamed of thee ! 
I knew it not, but sure I dreamed of thee, 
For in my sleep I thought I saw a king ! 

De Vard e s 
O love ! — 

Y V ETTE 

It is Morbec arises there ! 
The sands that stretch above the idle waves, 
And all the little shells upon the shore ! 

D e Vard e s 
The convent bell is ringing ! Seest thou not 
The fountain old, the fruit trees in the sun? 

Yvette 
Oh, life was never made for happiness ! 
The hour 's too short, the wine spills from the cup, 
The blossom 's shaken ere we know 't is sweet ! 

Voices from the River 
Misericorde ! 



232 THE GODDESS 

A Soldier 
Those two have waited long ! 
Hi ! Petit-Pierre, 't is time to marry them — 

De Vardes 
This Saint John's Eve we '11 walk in other woods ! 
And we will find and name a castle fair, 
And rose and heartsease we will plant thereby ! 
Here ends this road, but we must onward go. 
There is a longer hour, a deeper cup ! 
The blossom 's gone, but we shall see the fruit. 
And life was made for happiness, my douce! 

A Voice from the River 

Mourir pour la patrie, 
Mourir pour la France. 

D e Vard e s 
It is a hymn of Chenier's. — France ! France ! 
Not since the days of Clovis hast thou lacked 
Strong sons to die for thee, thou Lioness ! 
But now thy own brood hast thou eaten up, 
And in the desert shalt thou roar alone, 
Seeing the hunters nearer, nearer creep ! 
They '11 snare thee fast, they '11 make of thee a show ! 
France, France ! — and yet thy sons shall ransom thee ! 

A Soldier 
A length of rope, Andre ! 

Another 

Petit-Pierre — 

Y v ETTE 
They come ! 



OF REASON 233 

D e Vard e s 
I will go first. 

Y v ETT E 

'T is not their way ! 
They '11 bind us fast together, throw us in 
Bound fast together — 

D e Vard e s 

Is it so P Why, then 
We are together still, my heart, my life ! 
We will not struggle as we sink to rest. 

A Soldier 
Man and woman, come your ways ! 

Second Soldier 

The river 
Waits, your marriage bed is spread ! 

[The knitting women sing from the river bank. 

The Women 
We are the tricot euses ! 
Our wool we knit beneath the sun and moon I 
Knit! knit I knitting every one I 

We are the tricot euses I 
The skein we knit is ravelled out full soon ! 
Knit! knit! the knitting now is done ! 

Y V ETT E 

The light is growing in the east ! My heart 
It is so full I cannot speak to thee ! 



234 GODDESS OF REASON 

D e Vard e s 
Put thou thine arms about my neck, Yvette, 
And lay thy head upon thy lover's heart. 
And veil thine eyes with all thy shadowy hair. 
Now let them bind us with what cords they will, 
The spirit moves unbound, triumphant, free, 
Not through the Loire, but through a vaster stream ! 
Oh, it is something dimly great to die ! 
And then to die together, is 't not sweet ? 
And not through illness, age, decrepitude, 
But the armed man is ready for new wars. 
And thou — 

Yvette 
I hear the lark ! 

A Soldier 

Come, come away ! 

[Yvette and De Vardes move together towards 
the river ^ into the mist and the shadow of the trees. 

A Voice from the River 
Vive la Republique ! 

C UR TAIN 




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